Papers tagged as PQC
  1. McTiny: Fast High-Confidence Post-Quantum Key Erasure for Tiny Network Servers 2020 PQC Storage Usenix eprint.iacr.org
    Daniel J. Bernstein

    Recent results have shown that some post-quantum cryptographic systems have encryption and decryption performance comparable to fast elliptic-curve cryptography (ECC) or even better. However, this performance metric is considering only CPU time and ignoring bandwidth and storage. High-confidence post-quantum encryption systems have much larger keys than ECC. For example, the code-based cryptosystem recommended by the PQCRYPTO project uses public keys of 1MB.


    Fast key erasure (to provide “forward secrecy”) requires new public keys to be constantly transmitted. Either the server needs to constantly generate, store, and transmit large keys, or it needs to receive, store, and use large keys from the clients. This is not necessarily a problem for overall bandwidth, but it is a problem for storage and computation time on tiny network servers. All straightforward approaches allow easy denial-of-service attacks.


    This paper describes a protocol, suitable for today’s networks and tiny servers, in which clients transmit their code-based one-time public keys to servers. Servers never store full client public keys but work on parts provided by the clients, without having to maintain any per-client state. Intermediate results are stored on the client side in the form of encrypted cookies and are eventually combined by the server to obtain the ciphertext. Requirements on the server side are very small: storage of one long-term private key, which is much smaller than a public key, and a few small symmetric cookie keys, which are updated regularly and erased after use. The protocol is highly parallel, requiring only a few round trips, and involves total bandwidth not much larger than a single public key. The total number of packets sent by each side is 971, each fitting into one IPv6 packet of less than 1280 bytes.


    The protocol makes use of the structure of encryption in code-based cryptography and benefits from small ciphertexts in code-based cryptography.

  2. Lattice-Based Group Signatures and Zero-Knowledge Proofs of Automorphism Stability 2018 CCS PQC Signatures ZK eprint.iacr.org
    Rafael del Pino, Vadim Lyubashevsky, and Gregor Seiler

    We present a group signature scheme, based on the hardness of lattice problems, whose outputs are more than an order of magnitude smaller than the currently most efficient schemes in the literature. Since lattice-based schemes are also usually non-trivial to efficiently implement, we additionally provide the first experimental implementation of lattice-based group signatures demonstrating that our construction is indeed practical – all operations take less than half a second on a standard laptop.


    A key component of our construction is a new zero-knowledge proof system for proving that a committed value belongs to a particular set of small size. The sets for which our proofs are applicable are exactly those that contain elements that remain stable under Galois automorphisms of the underlying cyclotomic number field of our lattice-based protocol. We believe that these proofs will find applications in other settings as well.


    The motivation of the new zero-knowledge proof in our construction is to allow the efficient use of the selectively-secure signature scheme (i.e. a signature scheme in which the adversary declares the forgery message before seeing the public key) of Agrawal et al. (Eurocrypt 2010) in constructions of lattice-based group signatures and other privacy protocols. For selectively-secure schemes to be meaningfully converted to standard signature schemes, it is crucial that the size of the message space is not too large. Using our zero-knowledge proofs, we can strategically pick small sets for which we can provide efficient zero-knowledge proofs of membership.

  3. TACHYON: Fast Signatures from Compact Knapsack 2018 CCS PQC Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Rouzbeh Behnia, Muslum Ozgur Ozmen, Attila A. Yavuz, and Mike Rosulek

    We introduce a simple, yet efficient digital signature scheme which offers post-quantum security promise. Our scheme, named TACHYON, is based on a novel approach for extending one-time hash-based signatures to (polynomially bounded) many-time signatures, using the additively homomorphic properties of generalized compact knapsack functions. Our design permits TACHYON to achieve several key properties. First, its signing and verification algorithms are the fastest among its current counterparts with a higher level of security. This allows TACHYON to achieve the lowest end-to-end delay among its counterparts, while also making it suitable for resource-limited signers. Second, its private keys can be as small as κ bits, where κ is the desired security level. Third, unlike most of its lattice-based counterparts, TACHYON does not require any Gaussian sampling during signing, and therefore, is free from side-channel attacks targeting this process. We also explore various speed and storage trade-offs for TACHYON, thanks to its highly tunable parameters. Some of these trade-offs can speed up TACHYON signing in exchange for larger keys, thereby permitting TACHYON to further improve its end-to-end delay.

  4. CSIDH: An Efficient Post-Quantum Commutative Group Action 2018 Asiacrypt Isogenies KeyExchange PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Wouter Castryck and Tanja Lange and Chloe Martindale and Lorenz Panny and Joost Renes

    We propose an efficient commutative group action suitable for non-interactive key exchange in a post-quantum setting. Our construction follows the layout of the Couveignes-Rostovtsev-Stolbunov cryptosystem, but we apply it to supersingular elliptic curves defined over a large prime field Fp, rather than to ordinary elliptic curves. The Diffie-Hellman scheme resulting from the group action allows for public-key validation at very little cost, runs reasonably fast in practice, and has public keys of only 64 bytes at a conjectured AES-128 security level, matching NIST’s post-quantum security category I.

  5. Practical attacks against the Walnut digital signature scheme 2018 Asiacrypt Attacks Cryptanalysis PQC Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Ward Beullens and Simon R. Blackburn

    Recently, NIST started the process of standardizing quantum- resistant public-key cryptographic algorithms. WalnutDSA, the subject of this paper, is one of the 20 proposed signature schemes that are being considered for standardization. Walnut relies on a one-way function called E-Multiplication, which has a rich algebraic structure. This paper shows that this structure can be exploited to launch several practical attacks against the Walnut cryptosystem. The attacks work very well in practice; it is possible to forge signatures and compute equivalent secret keys for the 128-bit and 256-bit security parameters submitted to NIST in less than a second and in less than a minute respectively.

  6. A simple and compact algorithm for SIDH with arbitrary degree isogenies 2017 Asiacrypt EllipticCurves PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Craig Costello and Huseyin Hisil

    We derive a new formula for computing arbitrary odd-degree isogenies between elliptic curves in Montgomery form. The formula lends itself to a simple and compact algorithm that can efficiently compute any low odd-degree isogenies inside the supersingular isogeny Diffie-Hellman (SIDH) key exchange protocol. Our implementation of this algorithm shows that, beyond the commonly used 3-isogenies, there is a moderate degradation in relative performance of (2d+1)-isogenies as d grows, but that larger values of d


    can now be used in practical SIDH implementations.


    We further show that the proposed algorithm can be used to both compute isogenies of curves and evaluate isogenies at points, unifying the two main types of functions needed for isogeny-based public-key cryptography. Together, these results open the door for practical SIDH on a much wider class of curves, and allow for simplified SIDH implementations that only need to call one general-purpose function inside the fundamental computation of the large degree secret isogenies.


    As an additional contribution, we also give new explicit formulas for 3- and 4-isogenies, and show that these give immediate speedups when substituted into pre-existing SIDH libraries.

  7. A Post-Quantum Digital Signature Scheme Based on Supersingular Isogenies 2017 FinancialCryptography Isogenies PQC Signatures fc17.ifca.ai
    Youngho Yoo, Reza Azarderakhsh, Amir Jalali, David Jao, Vladimir Soukharev

    We present the first general-purpose digital signature scheme based on supersingular elliptic curve isogenies secure against quantum adversaries in the quantum random oracle model with small key sizes. This scheme is an application of Unruh’s construction of non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs to an interactive zero-knowledge proof proposed by De Feo, Jao, and Plût. We implement our proposed scheme on an x86-64 PC platform as well as an ARM-powered device. We exploit the state-of-the-art techniques to speed up the computations for general C and assembly. Finally, we provide timing results for real world applications.

  8. Efficient compression of SIDH public keys 2017 Diffie-Hellman EllipticCurves Eurocrypt Isogenies PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Craig Costello, David Jao, Patrick Longa, Michael Naehrig, Joost Renes, and David Urbanik

    Supersingular isogeny Diffie-Hellman (SIDH) is an attractive candidate for post-quantum key exchange, in large part due to its relatively small public key sizes. A recent paper by Azarderakhsh, Jao, Kalach, Koziel and Leonardi showed that the public keys defined in Jao and De Feo’s original SIDH scheme can be further compressed by around a factor of two, but reported that the performance penalty in utilizing this compression blew the overall SIDH runtime out by more than an order of magnitude. Given that the runtime of SIDH key exchange is currently its main drawback in relation to its lattice- and code-based post-quantum alternatives, an order of magnitude performance penalty for a factor of two improvement in bandwidth presents a trade-off that is unlikely to favor public-key compression in many scenarios.


    In this paper, we propose a range of new algorithms and techniques that accelerate SIDH public-key compression by more than an order of magnitude, making it roughly as fast as a round of standalone SIDH key exchange, while further reducing the size of the compressed public keys by approximately 12.5%. These improvements enable the practical use of compression, achieving public keys of only 330 bytes for the concrete parameters used to target 128 bits of quantum security and further strengthens SIDH as a promising post-quantum primitive.

  9. The SPHINCS+ Signature Framework 2019 CCS PQC Signatures sphincs.org
    Daniel J. Bernstein, Andreas Hülsing, Stefan Kölbl, Ruben Niederhagen, Joost Rijneveld and Peter Schwabe

    We introduce SPHINCS+, a stateless hash-based signature framework. SPHINCS+ has significant advantages over the state of the art in terms of speed, signature size, and security, and is among the nine remaining signature schemes in the second round of the NIST PQC standardization project. One of our main contributions in this context is a new few-time signature scheme that we call FORS. Our second main contribution is the introduction of tweakable hash functions and a demonstration how they allow for a unified security analysis of hash-based signature schemes. We give a security reduction for SPHINCS+ using this abstraction and derive secure parameters in accordance with the resulting bound. Finally, we present speed results for our optimized implementation of SPHINCS+ and compare to SPHINCS-256, Gravity-SPHINCS, and Picnic.

  10. MatRiCT: Efficient, Scalable and Post-Quantum Blockchain Confidential Transactions Protocol 2019 Blockchains CCS Lattices PQC Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Muhammed F. Esgin, Raymond K. Zhao, Ron Steinfeld, Joseph K. Liu and Dongxi Liu

    We introduce MatRiCT, an efficient RingCT protocol for blockchain confidential transactions, whose security is based on ``post-quantum’’ (module) lattice assumptions. The proof length of the protocol is around two orders of magnitude shorter than the existing post-quantum proposal, and scales efficiently to large anonymity sets, unlike the existing proposal. Further, we provide the first full implementation of a post-quantum RingCT, demonstrating the practicality of our scheme. In particular, a typical transaction can be generated in a fraction of a second and verified in about 23 ms on a standard PC. Moreover, we show how our scheme can be extended to provide auditability, where a user can select a particular authority from a set of authorities to reveal her identity. The user also has the ability to select no auditing and all these auditing options may co-exist in the same environment.


    The key ingredients, introduced in this work, of MatRiCT are 1) the shortest to date scalable ring signature from standard lattice assumptions with no Gaussian sampling required, 2) a novel balance zero-knowledge proof and 3) a novel extractable commitment scheme from (module) lattices. We believe these ingredients to be of independent interest for other privacy-preserving applications such as secure e-voting. Despite allowing 64-bit precision for transaction amounts, our new balance proof, and thus our protocol, does not require a range proof on a wide range (such as 32- or 64-bit ranges), which has been a major obstacle against efficient lattice-based solutions.


    Further, we provide new formal definitions for RingCT-like protocols, where the real-world blockchain setting is captured more closely. The definitions are applicable in a generic setting, and thus are believed to contribute to the development of future confidential transaction protocols in general (not only in the lattice setting).

  11. GALACTICS: Gaussian Sampling for Lattice-Based Constant-Time Implementation of Cryptographic Signatures, Revisited 2019 CCS Lattices PQC Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Gilles Barthe, Sonia Belaïd, Thomas Espitau, Pierre-Alain Fouque, Mélissa Rossi and Mehdi Tibouchi

    In this paper, we propose a constant-time implementation of the BLISS lattice-based signature scheme. BLISS is possibly the most efficient lattice-based signature scheme proposed so far, with a level of performance on par with widely used pre-quantum primitives like ECDSA. It is only one of the few postquantum signatures to have seen real-world deployment, as part of the strongSwan VPN software suite.


    The outstanding performance of the BLISS signature scheme stems in large part from its reliance on discrete Gaussian distributions, which allow for better parameters and security reductions. However, that advantage has also proved to be its Achilles’ heel, as discrete Gaussians pose serious challenges in terms of secure implementations. Implementations of BLISS so far have included secret-dependent branches and memory accesses, both as part of the discrete Gaussian sampling and of the essential rejection sampling step in signature generation. These defects have led to multiple devastating timing attacks, and were a key reason why BLISS was not submitted to the NIST postquantum standardization effort. In fact, almost all of the actual candidates chose to stay away from Gaussians despite their efficiency advantage, due to the serious concerns surrounding implementation security.


    Moreover, naive countermeasures will often not cut it: we show that a reasonable-looking countermeasure suggested in previous work to protect the BLISS rejection sampling can again be defeated using novel timing attacks, in which the timing information is fed to phase retrieval machine learning algorithm in order to achieve a full key recovery.


    Fortunately, we also present careful implementation techniques that allow us to describe an implementation of BLISS with complete timing attack protection, achieving the same level of efficiency as the original unprotected code, without resorting on floating point arithmetic or platform-specific optimizations like AVX intrinsics. These techniques, including a new approach to the polynomial approximation of transcendental function, can also be applied to the masking of the BLISS signature scheme, and will hopefully make more efficient and secure implementations of lattice-based cryptography possible going forward.