Papers tagged as FHE
  1. Secure Outsourced Matrix Computation and Application to Neural Networks 2018 CCS FHE MachineLearning eprint.iacr.org
    Xiaoqian Jiang, Miran Kim, Kristin Lauter, and Yongsoo Song

    Homomorphic Encryption (HE) is a powerful cryptographic primitive to address privacy and security issues in outsourcing computation on sensitive data to an untrusted computation environment. Comparing to secure Multi-Party Computation (MPC), HE has advantages in supporting non-interactive operations and saving on communication costs. However, it has not come up with an optimal solution for modern learning frameworks, partially due to a lack of efficient matrix computation mechanisms.


    In this work, we present a practical solution to encrypt a matrix homomorphically and perform arithmetic operations on encrypted matrices. Our solution includes a novel matrix encoding method and an efficient evaluation strategy for basic matrix operations such as addition, multiplication, and transposition. We also explain how to encrypt more than one matrix in a single ciphertext, yielding better amortized performance.


    Our solution is generic in the sense that it can be applied to most of the existing HE schemes. It also achieves reasonable performance for practical use; for example, our implementation takes 0.6 seconds to multiply two encrypted square matrices of order 64 and 0.09 seconds to transpose a square matrix of order 64.


    Our secure matrix computation mechanism has a wide applicability to our new framework E2DM, which stands for encrypted data and encrypted model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that supports secure evaluation of the prediction phase based on both encrypted data and encrypted model, whereas previous work only supported applying a plain model to encrypted data. As a benchmark, we report an experimental result to classify handwritten images using convolutional neural networks (CNN). Our implementation on the MNIST dataset takes 1.69 seconds to compute ten likelihoods of 64 input images simultaneously, yielding an amortized rate of 26 milliseconds per image.

  2. Labeled PSI from Fully Homomorphic Encryption with Malicious Security 2018 CCS FHE PSI eprint.iacr.org
    Hao Chen, Zhicong Huang, Kim Laine and Peter Rindal

    Private Set Intersection (PSI) allows two parties, the sender and the receiver, to compute the intersection of their private sets without revealing extra information to each other. We are interested in the {\it unbalanced} PSI setting, where (1) the receiver’s set is significantly smaller than the sender’s, and (2) the receiver (with the smaller set) has a low-power device. Also, in a {\it Labeled PSI} setting, the sender holds a label per each item in its set, and the receiver obtains the labels from the items in the intersection. We build upon the unbalanced PSI protocol of Chen, Laine, and Rindal (CCS 2017) in several ways: we add efficient support for arbitrary length items, we construct and implement an unbalanced Labeled PSI protocol with small communication complexity, and also strengthen the security model using Oblivious Pseudo-Random Function (OPRF) in a pre-processing phase. Our protocols outperform previous ones: for an intersection of 220 and 512 size sets of arbitrary length items our protocol has a total online running time of just 1 second (single thread), and a total communication cost of 4 MB. For a larger example, an intersection of 228 and 1024 size sets of arbitrary length items has an online running time of 12 seconds (multi-threaded), with less than 18 MB of total communication.

  3. ALCHEMY: A Language and Compiler for Homomorphic Encryption Made easY 2018 CCS FHE web.eecs.umich.edu
    Eric Crockett, Chris Jason Peikert, and Chad Sharp

    Fully Homomorphic Encryption (FHE) is a cryptographic “holy grail” that allows a worker to perform arbitrary computations on client-encrypted data, without learning anything about the data itself. Since the first plausible construction in 2009, a variety of FHE implementations have been given and used for particular applications of interest. Unfortunately, using FHE is currently very complicated, and a great deal of expertise is required to properly implement nontrivial homomorphic computations. This work introduces ALCHEMY, a modular and extensible system that simplifies and accelerates the use of FHE. ALCHEMY compiles “in-the-clear” computations on plaintexts, written in a modular domain-specific language~(DSL), into corresponding homomorphic computations on ciphertexts—with no special knowledge of FHE required of the programmer. The compiler automatically chooses (most of the) parameters by statically inferring ciphertext noise rates, generates keys and “key-switching hints,” schedules appropriate ciphertext “maintenance” operations, and more. In addition, its components can be combined modularly to provide other useful functionality, such logging the empirical noise rates of ciphertexts throughout a computation, without requiring any changes to the original DSL code. As a testbed application, we demonstrate fast homomorphic evaluation of a pseudorandom function~(PRF) based on Ring-LWR, whose entire implementation is only a few dozen lines of simple DSL code. For a single (non-batched) evaluation, our unoptimized implementation takes only about 10 seconds on a commodity PC, which is more than an order of magnitude faster than state-of-the-art homomorphic evaluations of other PRFs, including some specifically designed for amenability to homomorphic evaluation.

  4. Secure Search via Multi-Ring Fully Homomorphic Encryption 2018 CCS EncryptedDatabases FHE SearchableEncryption eprint.iacr.org
    Adi Akavia, Dan Feldman, and Hayim Shaul

    Secure search is the problem of securely retrieving from a database table (or any unsorted array) the records matching specified attributes, as in SQL ``SELECT…WHERE…’’ queries, but where the database and the query are encrypted. Secure search has been the leading example for practical applications of Fully Homomorphic Encryption (FHE) since Gentry’s seminal work in 2009, attaining the desired properties of a single-round low-communication protocol with semantic security for database and query (even during search). Nevertheless, the wide belief was that the high computational overhead of current FHE candidates is too prohibitive in practice for secure search solutions (except for the restricted case of searching for a uniquely identified record as in SQL UNIQUE constrain and Private Information Retrieval). This is due to the high degree in existing solutions that is proportional at least to the number of database records m.


    We present the first algorithm for secure search that is realized by a polynomial of logarithmic degree (log m)^c for a small constant c>0. We implemented our algorithm in an open source library based on HElib, and ran experiments on Amazon’s EC2 cloud with up to 100 processors. Our experiments show that we can securely search to retrieve database records in a rate of searching in millions of database records in less than an hour on a single machine.


    We achieve our result by: (1) Designing a novel sketch that returns the first strictly-positive entry in a (not necessarily sparse) array of non-negative real numbers; this sketch may be of independent interest. (2) Suggesting a multi-ring evaluation of FHE – instead of a single ring as in prior works – and leveraging this to achieve an exponential reduction in the degree.

  5. Improved Bootstrapping for Approximate Homomorphic Encryption 2019 Eurocrypt FHE eprint.iacr.org
    Hao Chen, Ilaria Chillotti and Yongsoo Song

    Since Cheon et al. introduced a homomorphic encryption scheme for approximate arithmetic (Asiacrypt ’17), it has been recognized as suitable for important real-life usecases of homomorphic encryption, including training of machine learning models over encrypted data. A follow up work by Cheon et al. (Eurocrypt ’18) described an approximate bootstrapping procedure for the scheme. In this work, we improve upon the previous bootstrapping result. We improve the amortized bootstrapping time per plaintext slot by two orders of magnitude, from ∼ 1 second to ∼ 0.01 second. To achieve this result, we adopt a smart level-collapsing technique for evaluating DFT-like linear transforms on a ciphertext. Also, we replace the Taylor approximation of the sine function with a more accurate and numerically stable Chebyshev approximation, and design a modified version of the Paterson-Stockmeyer algorithm for fast evaluation of Chebyshev polynomials over encrypted data.

  6. Faster Homomorphic Evaluation of Discrete Fourier Transforms 2017 FHE FinancialCryptography Privacy fc17.ifca.ai
    Anamaria Costache, Nigel P. Smart, Srinivas Vivek

    We present a methodology to achieve low latency homomorphic operations on approximations to complex numbers, by encoding a complex number as an evaluation of a polynomial at a root of unity. We then use this encoding to evaluate a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) on data which has been encrypted using a Somewhat Homomorphic Encryption (SHE) scheme, with up to three orders of magnitude improvement in latency over previous methods. We are also able to deal with much larger input sizes than previous methods. Due to the fact that the entire DFT algorithm is an algebraic operation over the underlying ring of the SHE scheme (for a suitably chosen ring), our method for the DFT utilizes exact arithmetic over the complex numbers, as opposed to approximations.

  7. Homomorphic Lower Digits Removal and Improved FHE Bootstrapping 2018 Eurocrypt FHE PublicKeyEncryption eprint.iacr.org
    Hao Chen and Kyoohyung Han

    Bootstrapping is a crucial operation in Gentry’s breakthrough work on fully homomorphic encryption (FHE), where a homomorphic encryption scheme evaluates its own decryption algorithm. There has been a couple of implementations of bootstrapping, among which HElib arguably marks the state-of-the-art in terms of throughput, ciphertext/message size ratio and support for large plaintext moduli.


    In this work, we apply a family of “lowest digit removal” polynomials to improve homomorphic digit extraction algorithm which is crucial part in bootstrapping for both FV and BGV schemes. If the secret key has 1-norm h=l1(s) and the plaintext modulus is t=pr, we achieved bootstrapping depth logh+log(logp(ht)) in FV scheme. In case of the BGV scheme, we bring down the depth from logh+2logt to logh+logt.


    We implemented bootstrapping for FV in the SEAL library. Besides the regular mode, we introduce another “slim mode’”, which restrict the plaintexts to batched vectors in Zpr. The slim mode has similar throughput as the regular mode, while each individual run is much faster and uses much smaller memory. For example, bootstrapping takes 6.75 seconds for 7 bit plaintext space with 64 slots and 1381 seconds for GF(257128) plaintext space with 128 slots. We also implemented our improved digit extraction procedure for the BGV scheme in HElib.

  8. Improving TFHE: faster packed homomorphicoperations and efficient circuit bootstrapping 2017 Asiacrypt FHE eprint.iacr.org
    Ilaria Chillotti and Nicolas Gama and Mariya Georgieva and Malika Izabachène

    In this paper, we present several methods to improve the evaluation of homomorphic functions, both for fully and for leveled homomorphic encryption. We propose two packing methods, in order to decrease the expansion factor and optimize the evaluation of look-up tables and random functions in TRGSW-based homomorphic schemes. We also extend the automata logic, introduced in [19, 12], to the efficient leveled evaluation of weighted automata, and present a new homomorphic counter called TBSR, that supports all the elementary operations that occur in a multiplication. These improvements speed-up the evaluation of most arithmetic functions in a packed leveled mode, with a noise overhead that remains additive. We finally present a new circuit bootstrapping that converts TLWE into low-noise TRGSW ciphertexts in just 137ms, which makes the leveled mode of TFHE composable, and which is fast enough to speed-up arithmetic functions, compared to the gate-by-gate bootstrapping given in [12]. Finally, we propose concrete parameter sets and timing comparison for all our constructions.

  9. Outsourcing Medical Dataset Analysis: A Possible Solution 2017 FHE FinancialCryptography medical fc17.ifca.ai
    Gabriel Kaptchuk, Matthew Green, Aviel Rubin

    We explore the possible ways modern cryptographic methodscan be applied to the field of medical data analysis. Current systems require large computational facilities owned by the data owners or excessive trust given to the researchers. We implement one possible solution inwhich researchers operate directly on homomorphically encrypted data and the data owner decrypts the results. We test our implementation on large datasets and show that it is sufficiently practical that it could be a helpful tool for modern researchers. We also perform a heuristic analysis of the security of our system.

  10. Onion Ring ORAM: Efficient Constant Bandwidth Oblivious RAM from (Leveled) TFHE 2019 CCS FHE ORAM eprint.iacr.org
    Hao Chen, Ilaria Chillotti and Ling Ren

    Oblivious RAM (ORAM) is a cryptographic primitive that allows a client to hide access pattern to its data encrypted and stored at a remote server. Traditionally, ORAM algorithms assume the server acts purely as a storage device. Under this assumption, ORAM has at least log(N) bandwidth blowup for N data entries. After three decades of improvements, ORAM algorithms have reached the optimal logarithmic bandwidth blowup. Nonetheless, in many practical use-cases, a constant bandwidth overhead is desirable. To this purpose, Devadas et al. (TCC 2016) formalized the server computation model for ORAM and proposed Onion ORAMwhich relies on homomorphic computation to achieve constant worst-case bandwidth blowup. This line of work is generally believed to be purely theoretical, due to the large overheads of homomorphic computation. In this paper, we present Onion Ring ORAM, the first efficient constant bandwidth ORAM scheme in the single server model, based on the Onion ORAM construction and the leveled version of the TFHE scheme by Chillotti et al.. We propose a series of improvements, most notably including a more efficient homomorphic permutation protocol. We implement Onion Ring ORAM and show that it can outperform state-of-the-art logarithmic-bandwidth ORAM like Path ORAMs and Ring ORAM when the network throughput is limited. Under one setting, our construction reduces monetary cost per access by 40% and end-to-end latency by 35% over Ring ORAM.

  11. Efficient Multi-Key Homomorphic Encryption with Packed Ciphertexts with Application to Oblivious Neural Network Inference 2019 CCS FHE MachineLearning eprint.iacr.org
    Hao Chen, Wei Dai, Miran Kim and Yongsoo Song

    Homomorphic Encryption (HE) is a cryptosystem which supports computation on encrypted data. López-Alt et al. (STOC 2012) proposed a generalized notion of HE, called Multi-Key Homomorphic Encryption (MKHE), which is capable of performing arithmetic operations on ciphertexts encrypted under different keys.


    In this paper, we present multi-key variants of two HE schemes with packed ciphertexts. We present new relinearization algorithms which are simpler and faster than previous method by Chen et al. (TCC 2017). We then generalize the bootstrapping techniques for HE to obtain multi-key fully homomorphic encryption schemes. We provide a proof-of-concept implementation of both MKHE schemes using Microsoft SEAL. For example, when the dimension of base ring is 8192, homomorphic multiplication between multi-key BFV (resp. CKKS) ciphertexts associated with four parties followed by a relinearization takes about 116 (resp. 67) milliseconds.


    Our MKHE schemes have a wide range of applications in secure computation between multiple data providers. As a benchmark, we homomorphically classify an image using a pre-trained neural network model, where input data and model are encrypted under different keys. Our implementation takes about 1.8 seconds to evaluate one convolutional layer followed by two fully connected layers on an encrypted image from the MNIST dataset.

  12. Using FHE for Statistical Analysis of Categorical, Ordinal and Numerical Data 2017 FHE NDSS Outsourcing eprint.iacr.org
    Wenjie Lu and Shohei Kawasaki and Jun Sakuma

    In recent years, there has been a growing trend towards outsourcing of computational tasks with the development of cloud services. The Gentry’s pioneering work of fully homomorphic encryption (FHE) and successive works have opened a new vista for secure and practical cloud computing. In this paper, we consider performing statistical analysis on encrypted data. To improve the efficiency of the computations, we take advantage of the batched computation based on the Chinese-Remainder-Theorem. We propose two building blocks that work with FHE: a novel batch greater-than primitive, and matrix primitive for encrypted matrices. With these building blocks, we construct secure procedures and protocols for different types of statistics including the histogram (count), contingency table (with cell suppression) for categorical data; k-percentile for ordinal data; and principal component analysis and linear regression for numerical data. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods, we ran experiments in five real datasets. For instance, we can compute a contingency table with more than 50 cells from 4000 of data in just 5 minutes, and we can train a linear regression model with more than 40k of data and dimension as high as 6 within 15 minutes. We show that the FHE is not as slow as commonly believed and it becomes feasible to perform a broad range of statistical analysis on thousands of encrypted data.