1. Everybody's a Target: Scalability in Public-Key Encryption 2020 EllipticCurves Eurocrypt PKI PublicKeyEncryption eprint.iacr.org
    Benedikt Auerbach, Federico Giacon and Eike Kiltz

    For 1≤m≤n, we consider a natural m-out-of-n multi-instance scenario for a public-key encryption (PKE) scheme. An adversary, given n independent instances of PKE, wins if he breaks at least m out of the n instances. In this work, we are interested in the scaling factor of PKE schemes, SF, which measures how well the difficulty of breaking m out of the n instances scales in m. That is, a scaling factor SF=ℓ indicates that breaking m out of n instances is at least ℓ times more difficult than breaking one single instance. A PKE scheme with small scaling factor hence provides an ideal target for mass surveillance. In fact, the Logjam attack (CCS 2015) implicitly exploited, among other things, an almost constant scaling factor of ElGamal over finite fields (with shared group parameters).


    For Hashed ElGamal over elliptic curves, we use the generic group model to argue that the scaling factor depends on the scheme’s granularity. In low granularity, meaning each public key contains its independent group parameter, the scheme has optimal scaling factor SF=m; In medium and high granularity, meaning all public keys share the same group parameter, the scheme still has a reasonable scaling factor SF=m−−√. Our findings underline that instantiating ElGamal over elliptic curves should be preferred to finite fields in a multi-instance scenario.


    As our main technical contribution, we derive new generic-group lower bounds of Ω(mp−−−√) on the difficulty of solving both the m-out-of-n Gap Discrete Logarithm and the m-out-of-n Gap Computational Diffie-Hellman problem over groups of prime order p, extending a recent result by Yun (EUROCRYPT 2015). We establish the lower bound by studying the hardness of a related computational problem which we call the search-by-hypersurface problem.

  2. Fast Multiparty Threshold ECDSA with Fast Trustless Setup 2018 CCS EllipticCurves Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Rosario Gennaro and Steven Goldfeder

    A threshold signature scheme enables distributed signing among n players such that any subgroup of size t+1 can sign, whereas any group with t or fewer players cannot. While there exist previous threshold schemes for the ECDSA signature scheme, we present the first protocol that supports multiparty signatures for any t≤n with efficient, dealerless key generation. Our protocol is faster than previous solutions and significantly reduces the communication complexity as well. We prove our scheme secure against malicious adversaries with a dishonest majority. We implemented our protocol, demonstrating its efficiency and suitability to be deployed in practice.

  3. Two-Party ECDSA from Hash Proof Systems and Efficient Instantiations 2019 Crypto EllipticCurves Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Guilhem Castagnos and Dario Catalano and Fabien Laguillaumie and Federico Savasta and Ida Tucker

    ECDSA is a widely adopted digital signature standard. Unfortunately, efficient distributed variants of this primitive are notoriously hard to achieve and known solutions often require expensive zero knowledge proofs to deal with malicious adversaries. For the two party case, Lindell [Lin17] recently managed to get an efficient solution which, to achieve simulation-based security, relies on an interactive, non standard, assumption on Paillier’s cryptosystem.


    In this paper we generalize Lindell’s solution using hash proof systems. The main advantage of our generic method is that it results in a simulation-based security proof without resorting to non-standard interactive assumptions.


    Moving to concrete constructions, we show how to instantiate our framework using class groups of imaginary quadratic fields. Our implementations show that the practical impact of dropping such interactive assumptions is minimal. Indeed, while for 128-bit security our scheme is marginally slower than Lindell’s, for 256-bit security it turns out to be better both in key generation and signing time. Moreover, in terms of communication cost, our implementation significantly reduces both the number of rounds and the transmitted bits without exception.

  4. Fast Secure Multiparty ECDSA with Practical Distributed Key Generation and Applications to Cryptocurrency Custody 2018 Blockchains CCS EllipticCurves MPC Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Yehuda Lindell, Ariel Nof, and Samuel Ranellucci

    ECDSA is a standardized signing algorithm that is widely used in TLS, code signing, cryptocurrency and more. Due to its importance, the problem of securely computing ECDSA in a distributed manner (known as threshold signing) has received considerable interest. However, despite this interest, there is still no full threshold solution for more than 2 parties (meaning that any t-out-of-n parties can sign, security is preserved for any t−1 or fewer corrupted parties, and t≤n can be any value thus supporting an honest minority) that has practical key distribution. This is due to the fact that all previous solutions for this utilize Paillier homomorphic encryption, and efficient distributed Paillier key generation for more than two parties is not known.


    In this paper, we present the first truly practical full threshold ECDSA signing protocol that has both fast signing and fast key distribution. This solves a years-old open problem, and opens the door to practical uses of threshold ECDSA signing that are in demand today. One of these applications is the construction of secure cryptocurrency wallets (where key shares are spread over multiple devices and so are hard to steal) and cryptocurrency custody solutions (where large sums of invested cryptocurrency are strongly protected by splitting the key between a bank/financial institution, the customer who owns the currency, and possibly a third-party trustee, in multiple shares at each). There is growing practical interest in such solutions, but prior to our work these could not be deployed today due to the need for distributed key generation.

  5. A simple and compact algorithm for SIDH with arbitrary degree isogenies 2017 Asiacrypt EllipticCurves PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Craig Costello and Huseyin Hisil

    We derive a new formula for computing arbitrary odd-degree isogenies between elliptic curves in Montgomery form. The formula lends itself to a simple and compact algorithm that can efficiently compute any low odd-degree isogenies inside the supersingular isogeny Diffie-Hellman (SIDH) key exchange protocol. Our implementation of this algorithm shows that, beyond the commonly used 3-isogenies, there is a moderate degradation in relative performance of (2d+1)-isogenies as d grows, but that larger values of d


    can now be used in practical SIDH implementations.


    We further show that the proposed algorithm can be used to both compute isogenies of curves and evaluate isogenies at points, unifying the two main types of functions needed for isogeny-based public-key cryptography. Together, these results open the door for practical SIDH on a much wider class of curves, and allow for simplified SIDH implementations that only need to call one general-purpose function inside the fundamental computation of the large degree secret isogenies.


    As an additional contribution, we also give new explicit formulas for 3- and 4-isogenies, and show that these give immediate speedups when substituted into pre-existing SIDH libraries.

  6. qDSA: Small and Secure Digital Signatureswith Curve-based Diffie–Hellman Key Pairs 2017 Asiacrypt EllipticCurves arxiv.org
    Joost Renes and Benjamin Smith

    qDSA is a high-speed, high-security signature scheme that facilitates implementations with a very small memory footprint, a crucial requirement for embedded systems and IoT devices, and that uses the same public keys as modern Diffie–Hellman schemes based on Montgomery curves (such as Curve25519) or Kummer surfaces. qDSA resembles an adaptation of EdDSA to the world of Kummer varieties, which are quotients of algebraic groups by ±1. Interestingly, qDSA does not require any full group operations or point recovery: all computations, including signature verification, occur on the quotient where there is no group law. We include details on four implementations of qDSA, using Montgomery and fast Kummer surface arithmetic on the 8-bit AVR ATmega and 32-bit ARM Cortex M0 platforms. We find that qDSA significantly outperforms state-of-the-art signature implementations in terms of stack usage and code size. We also include an efficient compression algorithm for points on fast Kummer surfaces, reducing them to the same size as compressed elliptic curve points for the same security level.

  7. Threshold ECDSA from ECDSA Assumptions: The Multiparty Case 2019 EllipticCurves Oakland Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Jack Doerner, Yashvanth Kondi, Eysa Lee, and abhi shelat

    Cryptocurrency applications have spurred a resurgence of interest in the computation of ECDSA signatures using threshold protocols—that is, protocols in which the signing key is secret-shared among n parties, of which any subset of size t must interact in order to compute a signature. Among the resulting works to date, that of Doerner et al. requires the most natural assumptions while also achieving the best practical signing speed. It is, however, limited to the setting in which the threshold is two. We propose an extension of their scheme to arbitrary thresholds, and prove it secure against a malicious adversary corrupting up to one party less than the threshold under only the Computational Diffie-Hellman Assumption in the Global Random Oracle model, an assumption strictly weaker than those under which ECDSA is proven.


    Whereas the best current schemes for threshold-two ECDSA signing use a Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange to calculate each signature’s nonce, a direct adaptation of this technique to a larger threshold t would incur a round count linear in t; thus we abandon it in favor of a new mechanism that yields a protocol requiring ⌈log(t)⌉+6 rounds in total. We design a new consistency check, similar in spirit to that of Doerner et al., but suitable for an arbitrary number of participants, and we optimize the underlying two-party multiplication protocol on which our scheme is based, reducing its concrete communication and computation costs.


    We implement our scheme and evaluate it among groups of up to 256 of co-located and geographically-distributed parties, and among small groups of embedded devices. We find that in the LAN setting, our scheme outperforms all prior works by orders of magnitude, and that it is efficient enough for use even on smartphones or hardware tokens. In the WAN setting we find that, despite its logarithmic round count, our protocol outperforms the best constant-round protocols in realistic scenarios.

  8. Efficient compression of SIDH public keys 2017 Diffie-Hellman EllipticCurves Eurocrypt Isogenies PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Craig Costello, David Jao, Patrick Longa, Michael Naehrig, Joost Renes, and David Urbanik

    Supersingular isogeny Diffie-Hellman (SIDH) is an attractive candidate for post-quantum key exchange, in large part due to its relatively small public key sizes. A recent paper by Azarderakhsh, Jao, Kalach, Koziel and Leonardi showed that the public keys defined in Jao and De Feo’s original SIDH scheme can be further compressed by around a factor of two, but reported that the performance penalty in utilizing this compression blew the overall SIDH runtime out by more than an order of magnitude. Given that the runtime of SIDH key exchange is currently its main drawback in relation to its lattice- and code-based post-quantum alternatives, an order of magnitude performance penalty for a factor of two improvement in bandwidth presents a trade-off that is unlikely to favor public-key compression in many scenarios.


    In this paper, we propose a range of new algorithms and techniques that accelerate SIDH public-key compression by more than an order of magnitude, making it roughly as fast as a round of standalone SIDH key exchange, while further reducing the size of the compressed public keys by approximately 12.5%. These improvements enable the practical use of compression, achieving public keys of only 330 bytes for the concrete parameters used to target 128 bits of quantum security and further strengthens SIDH as a promising post-quantum primitive.