Papers tagged as Asiacrypt
  1. CSIDH: An Efficient Post-Quantum Commutative Group Action 2018 Asiacrypt Isogenies KeyExchange PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Wouter Castryck and Tanja Lange and Chloe Martindale and Lorenz Panny and Joost Renes

    We propose an efficient commutative group action suitable for non-interactive key exchange in a post-quantum setting. Our construction follows the layout of the Couveignes-Rostovtsev-Stolbunov cryptosystem, but we apply it to supersingular elliptic curves defined over a large prime field Fp, rather than to ordinary elliptic curves. The Diffie-Hellman scheme resulting from the group action allows for public-key validation at very little cost, runs reasonably fast in practice, and has public keys of only 64 bytes at a conjectured AES-128 security level, matching NIST’s post-quantum security category I.

  2. A Universally Composable Framework for the Privacy of Email Ecosystems 2018 Asiacrypt Privacy UC eprint.iacr.org
    Pyrros Chaidos and Olga Fourtounelli and Aggelos Kiayias and Thomas Zacharias

    Email communication is amongst the most prominent online activities, and as such, can put sensitive information at risk. It is thus of high importance that internet email applications are designed in a privacy-aware manner and analyzed under a rigorous threat model. The Snowden revelations (2013) suggest that such a model should feature a global adversary, in light of the observational tools available. Furthermore, the fact that protecting metadata can be of equal importance as protecting the communication context implies that end-to-end encryption may be necessary, but it is not sufficient.


    With this in mind, we utilize the Universal Composability framework [Canetti, 2001] to introduce an expressive cryptographic model for email ``ecosystems’’ that can formally and precisely capture various well-known privacy notions (unobservability, anonymity, unlinkability, etc.), by parameterizing the amount of leakage an ideal-world adversary (simulator) obtains from the email functionality.


    Equipped with our framework, we present and analyze the security of two email constructions that follow different directions in terms of the efficiency vs. privacy tradeoff. The first one achieves optimal security (only the online/offline mode of the users is leaked), but it is mainly of theoretical interest; the second one is based on parallel mixing [Golle and Juels, 2004] and is more practical, while it achieves anonymity with respect to users that have similar amount of sending and receiving activity.

  3. Simple and Efficient Two-Server ORAM 2018 Asiacrypt ORAM PIR eprint.iacr.org
    S. Dov Gordon and Jonathan Katz and Xiao Wang

    We show a protocol for two-server oblivious RAM (ORAM) that is simpler and more efficient than the best prior work. Our construction combines any tree-based ORAM with an extension of a two-server private information retrieval scheme by Boyle et al., and is able to avoid recursion and thus use only one round of interaction. In addition, our scheme has a very cheap initialization phase, making it well suited for RAM-based secure computation. Although our scheme requires the servers to perform a linear scan over the entire data, the cryptographic computation involved consists only of block-cipher evaluations.


    A practical instantiation of our protocol has excellent concrete parameters: for storing an N
    -element array of arbitrary size data blocks with statistical security parameter λ, the servers each store 4N encrypted blocks, the client stores λ+2logN blocks, and the total communication per logical access is roughly 10logN encrypted blocks.

  4. Concretely Efficient Large-Scale MPC with Active Security (or, TinyKeys for TinyOT) 2018 Asiacrypt MPC eprint.iacr.org
    Carmit Hazay and Emmanuela Orsini and Peter Scholl and Eduardo Soria-Vazquez

    In this work we develop a new theory for concretely efficient, large-scale MPC with active security. Current practical techniques are mostly in the strong setting of all-but-one corruptions, which leads to protocols that scale badly with the number of parties. To work around this issue, we consider a large-scale scenario where a small minority out of many parties is honest and design scalable, more efficient MPC protocols for this setting. Our results are achieved by introducing new techniques for information-theoretic MACs with short keys and extending the work of Hazay et al. (CRYPTO 2018), which developed new passively secure MPC protocols in the same context. We further demonstrate the usefulness of this theory in practice by analyzing the concrete communication overhead of our protocols, which improve upon the most efficient previous works.

  5. Nearly Linear-Time Zero-Knowledge Proofs for Correct Program Execution 2018 Asiacrypt ZK eprint.iacr.org
    Jonathan Bootle and Andrea Cerulli and Jens Groth and Sune Jakobsen and Mary Maller

    There have been tremendous advances in reducing interaction, communication and verification time in zero-knowledge proofs but it remains an important challenge to make the prover efficient. We construct the first zero-knowledge proof of knowledge for the correct execution of a program on public and private inputs where the prover computation is nearly linear time. This saves a polylogarithmic factor in asymptotic performance compared to current state of the art proof systems.


    We use the TinyRAM model to capture general purpose processor computation. An instance consists of a TinyRAM program and public inputs. The witness consists of additional private inputs to the program. The prover can use our proof system to convince the verifier that the program terminates with the intended answer within given time and memory bounds. Our proof system has perfect completeness, statistical special honest verifier zero-knowledge, and computational knowledge soundness assuming linear-time computable collision-resistant hash functions exist.


    The main advantage of our new proof system is asymptotically efficient prover computation. The prover’s running time is only a superconstant factor larger than the program’s running time in an apples-to-apples comparison where the prover uses the same TinyRAM model. Our proof system is also efficient on the other performance parameters; the verifier’s running time time and the communication are sublinear in the execution time of the program and we only use a log-logarithmic number of rounds.

  6. Efficient Noninteractive Certification of RSA Moduli and Beyond 2019 Asiacrypt ZK eprint.iacr.org
    Sharon Goldberg and Leonid Reyzin, Omar Sagga and Foteini Baldimtsi

    In many applications, it is important to verify that an RSA public key (N,e) specifies a permutation over the entire space ZN, in order to prevent attacks due to adversarially-generated public keys. We design and implement a simple and efficient noninteractive zero-knowledge protocol (in the random oracle model) for this task. Applications concerned about adversarial key generation can just append our proof to the RSA public key without any other modifications to existing code or cryptographic libraries. Users need only perform a one-time verification of the proof to ensure that raising to the power e is a permutation of the integers modulo N. For typical parameter settings, the proof consists of nine integers modulo N; generating the proof and verifying it both require about nine modular exponentiations.


    We extend our results beyond RSA keys and also provide efficient noninteractive zero-knowledge proofs for other properties of N, which can be used to certify that N is suitable for the Paillier cryptosystem, is a product of two primes, or is a Blum integer. As compared to the recent work of Auerbach and Poettering (PKC 2018), who provide two-message protocols for similar languages, our protocols are more efficient and do not require interaction, which enables a broader class of applications.

  7. Forkcipher: a New Primitive for Authenticated Encryption of Very Short Messages 2019 Asiacrypt AuthenticatedEncryption SymmetricKey eprint.iacr.org
    Elena Andreeva, Virginie Lallemand, Antoon Purnal, Reza Reyhanitabar, Arnab Roy and Damian Vizar

    Highly efficient encryption and authentication of short messages is an essential requirement for enabling security in constrained scenarios such as the CAN FD in automotive systems (max. message size 64 bytes), massive IoT, critical communication domains of 5G, and Narrowband IoT, to mention a few. In addition, one of the NIST lightweight cryptography project requirements is that AEAD schemes shall be “optimized to be efficient for short messages (e.g., as short as 8 bytes)”.


    In this work we introduce and formalize a novel primitive in symmetric cryptography called a forkcipher. A forkcipher is a keyed function expanding a fixed-length input to a fixed-length output. We define its security as indistinguishability under chosen ciphertext attack. We give a generic construction validation via the new iterate-fork-iterate design paradigm.


    We then propose ForkSkinny as a concrete forkcipher instance with a public tweak and based on SKINNY: a tweakable lightweight block cipher constructed using the TWEAKEY framework. We conduct extensive cryptanalysis of ForkSkinny against classical and structure-specific attacks.


    We demonstrate the applicability of forkciphers by designing three new provably-secure, nonce-based AEAD modes which offer performance and security tradeoffs and are optimized for efficiency of very short messages. Considering a reference block size of 16 bytes, and ignoring possible hardware optimizations, our new AEAD schemes beat the best SKINNY-based AEAD modes. More generally, we show forkciphers are suited for lightweight applications dealing with predominantly short messages, while at the same time allowing handling arbitrary messages sizes.


    Furthermore, our hardware implementation results show that when we exploit the inherent parallelism of ForkSkinny we achieve the best performance when directly compared with the most efficient mode instantiated with the SKINNY block cipher.

  8. Pattern Matching on Encrypted Streams 2018 Asiacrypt EncryptedDatabases eprint.iacr.org
    Nicolas Desmoulins and Pierre-Alain Fouque and Cristina Onete and Olivier Sanders

    Pattern matching is essential in applications such as deep-packet inspection (DPI), searching on genomic data, or analyzing medical data. A simple task to do on plaintext data, pattern matching is much harder to do when the privacy of the data must be preserved. Existent solutions involve searchable encryption mechanisms with at least one of these three drawbacks: requiring an exhaustive (and static) list of keywords to be prepared before the data is encrypted (like in symmetric searchable encryption); requiring tokenization, i.e., breaking up the data to search into substrings and encrypting them separately (e.g., like BlindBox); relying on symmetric-key cryptography, thus implying a token-regeneration step for each encrypted-data source (e.g., user). Such approaches are ill-suited for pattern-matching with evolving patterns (e.g., updating virus signatures), variable searchword lengths, or when a single entity must filter ciphertexts from multiple parties.


    In this work, we introduce Searchable Encryption with Shiftable Trapdoors (SEST): a new primitive that allows for pattern matching with universal tokens (usable by all entities), in which keywords of arbitrary lengths can be matched to arbitrary ciphertexts. Our solution uses public-key encryption and bilinear pairings. It consists of projecting keywords on polynomials of degree equal to the length of the keyword and using a sliding-window-like technique to match the trapdoor to successive fragments of the encrypted data. In addition, very minor modifications to our solution enable it to take into account regular expressions, such as fully- or partly-unknown characters in a keyword (wildcards and interval/subset searches). Our trapdoor size is at most linear in the keyword length (and independent of the plaintext size), and we prove that the leakage to the searcher is only the trivial one: since the searcher learns whether the pattern occurs and where, it can distinguish based on different search results of a single trapdoor on two different plaintexts.


    To better show the usability of our scheme, we implemented it to run DPI on all the SNORT rules. We show that even for very large plaintexts, our encryption algorithm scales well. The pattern-matching algorithm is slightly slower, but extremely parallelizable, and it can thus be run even on very large data. Although our proofs use a (marginally) interactive assumption, we argue that this is a relatively small price to pay for the flexibility and privacy that we are able to attain.

  9. Quisquis: A New Design for Anonymous Cryptocurrencies 2019 Asiacrypt Blockchains Privacy eprint.iacr.org
    Prastudy Fauzi, Sarah Meiklejohn, Rebekah Mercer and Claudio Orlandi

    Despite their usage of pseudonyms rather than persistent identifiers, most existing cryptocurrencies do not provide users with any meaningful levels of privacy. This has prompted the creation of privacy-enhanced cryptocurrencies such as Monero and Zcash, which are specifically designed to counteract the tracking analysis possible in currencies like Bitcoin. These cryptocurrencies, however, also suffer from some drawbacks: in both Monero and Zcash, the set of potential unspent coins is always growing, which means users cannot store a concise representation of the blockchain. Additionally, Zcash requires a common reference string and the fact that addresses are reused multiple times in Monero has led to attacks to its anonymity.


    In this paper we propose a new design for anonymous cryptocurrencies, Quisquis, that achieves provably secure notions of anonymity. Quisquis stores a relatively small amount of data, does not require trusted setup, and in Quisquis each address appears on the blockchain at most twice: once when it is generated as output of a transaction, and once when it is spent as input to a transaction. Our result is achieved by combining a DDH-based tool (that we call updatable keys) with efficient zero-knowledge arguments.

  10. Practical attacks against the Walnut digital signature scheme 2018 Asiacrypt Attacks Cryptanalysis PQC Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Ward Beullens and Simon R. Blackburn

    Recently, NIST started the process of standardizing quantum- resistant public-key cryptographic algorithms. WalnutDSA, the subject of this paper, is one of the 20 proposed signature schemes that are being considered for standardization. Walnut relies on a one-way function called E-Multiplication, which has a rich algebraic structure. This paper shows that this structure can be exploited to launch several practical attacks against the Walnut cryptosystem. The attacks work very well in practice; it is possible to forge signatures and compute equivalent secret keys for the 128-bit and 256-bit security parameters submitted to NIST in less than a second and in less than a minute respectively.

  11. JIMU: Faster LEGO-based Secure Computation using Additive Homomorphic Hashes 2017 Asiacrypt MPC eprint.iacr.org
    Ruiyu Zhu and Yan Huang

    LEGO-style cut-and-choose is known for its asymptotic efficiency in realizing actively-secure computations. The dominant cost of LEGO protocols is due to wire-soldering — the key technique enabling to put independently generated garbled gates together in a bucket to realize a logical gate. Existing wire-soldering constructions rely on homomorphic commitments and their security requires the majority of the garbled gates in every bucket to be correct.


    In this paper, we propose an efficient construction of LEGO protocols that does not use homomorphic commitments but is able to guarantee security as long as at least one of the garbled gate in each bucket is correct. Additionally, the faulty gate detection rate in our protocol doubles that of the state-of-the-art LEGO constructions. With moderate additional cost, our approach can even detect faulty gates with probability 1, which enables us to run cut- and-choose on larger circuit gadgets rather than individual AND gates. We have implemented our protocol and our experiments on several benchmark applications show that the performance of our approach is highly competitive in comparison with existing implementations.

  12. Overlaying Circuit Clauses for Secure Computation 2017 Asiacrypt GarbledCircuits MPC eprint.iacr.org
    W. Sean Kennedy and Vladimir Kolesnikov and Gordon Wilfong

    Given a set S = {C_1,…,C_k } of Boolean circuits, we show how to construct a universal for S circuit C_0, which is much smaller than Valiant’s universal circuit or a circuit incorporating all C_1,…,C_k. Namely, given C_1,…,C_k and viewing them as directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) D_1,…,D_k, we embed them in a new graph D_0. The embedding is such that a GC garbling of any of C_1,…,C_k could be implemented by a corresponding garbling of a circuit corresponding to D_0.


    We show how to improve Garbled Circuit (GC) and GMW-based secure function evaluation (SFE) of circuits with if/switch clauses using such S-universal circuit.


    The most interesting case here is the application to the GMW approach. We provide a novel observation that in GMW the cost of processing a gate is almost the same for 5 (or more) Boolean inputs, as it is for the usual case of 2 Boolean inputs. While we expect this observation to greatly improve general GMW-based computation, in our context this means that GMW gates can be programmed almost for free, based on the secret-shared programming of the clause.


    Our approach naturally and cheaply supports nested clauses. Our algorithm is a heuristic; we show that solving the circuit embedding problem is NP-hard. Our algorithms are in the semi-honest model and are compatible with Free-XOR.


    We report on experimental evaluations and discuss achieved performance in detail. For 32 diverse circuits in our experiment, our construction results 6.1x smaller circuit than prior techniques.

  13. Efficient Scalable Constant-Round MPC via Garbled Circuits 2017 Asiacrypt GarbledCircuits MPC eprint.iacr.org
    Aner Ben-Efraim and Yehuda Lindell and Eran Omri

    In the setting of secure multiparty computation, a set of mutually distrustful parties carry out a joint computation of their inputs, without revealing anything but the output. Over recent years, there has been tremendous progress towards making secure computation practical, with great success in the two-party case. In contrast, in the multiparty case, progress has been much slower, even for the case of semi-honest adversaries.


    In this paper, we consider the case of constant-round multiparty computation, via the garbled circuit approach of BMR (Beaver et al., STOC 1990). In recent work, it was shown that this protocol can be efficiently instantiated for semi-honest adversaries (Ben-Efraim et al., ACM CCS 2016). However, it scales very poorly with the number of parties, since the cost of garbled circuit evaluation is quadratic in the number of parties, per gate. Thus, for a large number of parties, it becomes expensive. We present a new way of constructing a BMR-type garbled circuit that can be evaluated with only a constant number of operations per gate. Our constructions use key-homomorphic pseudorandom functions (one based on DDH and the other on Ring-LWE) and are concretely efficient. In particular, for a large number of parties (e.g., 100), our new circuit can be evaluated faster than the standard BMR garbled circuit that uses only AES computations. Thus, our protocol is an important step towards achieving concretely efficient large-scale multiparty computation for Internet-like settings (where constant-round protocols are needed due to high latency).

  14. Instantaneous Decentralized Poker 2017 Asiacrypt Blockchains MPC SmartContracts eprint.iacr.org
    Iddo Bentov and Ranjit Kumaresan and Andrew Miller

    We present efficient protocols for amortized secure multiparty computation with penalties and secure cash distribution, of which poker is a prime example. Our protocols have an initial phase where the parties interact with a cryptocurrency network, that then enables them to interact only among themselves over the course of playing many poker games in which money changes hands. The high efficiency of our protocols is achieved by harnessing the power of stateful contracts. Compared to the limited expressive power of Bitcoin scripts, stateful contracts enable richer forms of interaction between standard secure computation and a cryptocurrency. We formalize the stateful contract model and the security notions that our protocols accomplish, and provide proofs in the simulation paradigm. Moreover, we provide a reference implementation in Ethereum/Solidity for the stateful contracts that our protocols are based on. We also adapt our off-chain cash distribution protocols to the special case of stateful duplex micropayment channels, which are of independent interest. In comparison to Bitcoin based payment channels, our duplex channel implementation is more efficient and has additional features.

  15. A simple and compact algorithm for SIDH with arbitrary degree isogenies 2017 Asiacrypt EllipticCurves PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Craig Costello and Huseyin Hisil

    We derive a new formula for computing arbitrary odd-degree isogenies between elliptic curves in Montgomery form. The formula lends itself to a simple and compact algorithm that can efficiently compute any low odd-degree isogenies inside the supersingular isogeny Diffie-Hellman (SIDH) key exchange protocol. Our implementation of this algorithm shows that, beyond the commonly used 3-isogenies, there is a moderate degradation in relative performance of (2d+1)-isogenies as d grows, but that larger values of d


    can now be used in practical SIDH implementations.


    We further show that the proposed algorithm can be used to both compute isogenies of curves and evaluate isogenies at points, unifying the two main types of functions needed for isogeny-based public-key cryptography. Together, these results open the door for practical SIDH on a much wider class of curves, and allow for simplified SIDH implementations that only need to call one general-purpose function inside the fundamental computation of the large degree secret isogenies.


    As an additional contribution, we also give new explicit formulas for 3- and 4-isogenies, and show that these give immediate speedups when substituted into pre-existing SIDH libraries.

  16. qDSA: Small and Secure Digital Signatureswith Curve-based Diffie–Hellman Key Pairs 2017 Asiacrypt EllipticCurves arxiv.org
    Joost Renes and Benjamin Smith

    qDSA is a high-speed, high-security signature scheme that facilitates implementations with a very small memory footprint, a crucial requirement for embedded systems and IoT devices, and that uses the same public keys as modern Diffie–Hellman schemes based on Montgomery curves (such as Curve25519) or Kummer surfaces. qDSA resembles an adaptation of EdDSA to the world of Kummer varieties, which are quotients of algebraic groups by ±1. Interestingly, qDSA does not require any full group operations or point recovery: all computations, including signature verification, occur on the quotient where there is no group law. We include details on four implementations of qDSA, using Montgomery and fast Kummer surface arithmetic on the 8-bit AVR ATmega and 32-bit ARM Cortex M0 platforms. We find that qDSA significantly outperforms state-of-the-art signature implementations in terms of stack usage and code size. We also include an efficient compression algorithm for points on fast Kummer surfaces, reducing them to the same size as compressed elliptic curve points for the same security level.

  17. An Efficient Pairing-Based Shuffle Argument 2017 Asiacrypt NIZK Pairings eprint.iacr.org
    Prastudy Fauzi and Helger Lipmaa and Janno Siim and Michal Zajac

    We construct the most efficient known pairing-based NIZK shuffle argument. It consists of three subarguments that were carefully chosen to obtain optimal efficiency of the shuffle argument:




    • A same-message argument based on the linear subspace QANIZK argument of Kiltz and Wee,




    • A (simplified) permutation matrix argument of Fauzi, Lipmaa, and Zając,




    • A (simplified) consistency argument of Groth and Lu.




    We prove the knowledge-soundness of the first two subarguments in the generic bilinear group model, and the culpable soundness of the third subargument under a KerMDH assumption. This proves the soundness of the shuffle argument. We also discuss our partially optimized implementation that allows one to prove a shuffle of 100000
    ciphertexts in less than a minute and verify it in less than 1.5 minutes.

  18. The First Thorough Side-Channel Hardware Trojan 2017 Asiacrypt Attacks SideChannels eprint.iacr.org
    Maik Ender, Samaneh Ghandali, Amir Moradi, and Christof Paar

    Hardware Trojans have gained high attention in academia, industry and by government agencies. The effective detection mechanisms and countermeasures against such malicious designs are only possible when there is a deep understanding of how hardware Trojans can be built in practice. In this work, we present a mechanism which shows how easily a stealthy hardware Trojan can be inserted in a provably-secure side-channel analysis protected implementation. Once the Trojan is triggered, the malicious design exhibits exploitable side-channel leakage leading to successful key recovery attacks. Such a Trojan does not add or remove any logic (even a single gate) to the design which makes it very hard to detect. In ASIC platforms, it is indeed inserted by subtle manipulations at the sub-transistor level to modify the parameters of a few transistors. The same is applicable on FPGA applications by changing the routing of particular signals, leading to null resource utilization overhead. The underlying concept is based on a secure masked hardware implementation which does not exhibit any detectable leakage. However, by running the device at a particular clock frequency one of the requirements of the underlying masking scheme is not fulfilled anymore, i.e., the Trojan is triggered, and the device’s side-channel leakage can be exploited. Although as a case study we show an application of our designed Trojan on an FPGA-based threshold implementation of the PRESENT cipher, our methodology is a general approach and can be applied on any similar circuit.

  19. Consolidating Inner Product Masking 2017 Asiacrypt SideChannels eprint.iacr.org
    Josep Balasch and Sebastian Faust and Benedikt Gierlichs and Clara Paglialonga and François-Xavier Standaert

    Masking schemes are a prominent countermeasure to defeat power analysis attacks. One of their core ingredient is the encoding function. Due to its simplicity and comparably low complexity overheads,many masking schemes are based on a Boolean encoding. Yet, several recent works have proposed masking schemes that are based on alternative encoding functions. One such example is the inner product masking scheme that has been brought towards practice by recent research. In this work, we improve the practicality of the inner product masking scheme on multiple frontiers. On the conceptual level, we propose new algorithms that are significantly more efficient and have reduced randomness requirements, but remain secure in the t-probing model of Ishai, Sahai and Wagner (CRYPTO’03). On the practical level, we provide new implementation results. By exploiting several engineering tricks and combining them with our more efficient algorithms, we are able to reduce execution time by nearly 60% compared to earlier works. We complete our study by providing novel insights into the strength of the inner product masking using both the information theoretic evaluation framework of Standaert,Malkin and Yung (EUROCRYPT’09) and experimental analyses with an ARM microcontroller.

  20. Authenticated Encryption in the Face of Protocol and Side Channel Leakage 2017 Asiacrypt AuthenticatedEncryption Pairings SideChannels eprint.iacr.org
    Guy Barwell and Daniel P. Martin and Elisabeth Oswald and Martijn Stam

    Authenticated encryption schemes in practice have to be robust against adversaries that have access to various types of leakage, for instance decryption leakage on invalid ciphertexts (protocol leakage), or leakage on the underlying primitives (side channel leakage). This work includes several novel contributions: we augment the notion of nonce-base authenticated encryption with the notion of continuous leakage and we prove composition results in the face of protocol and side channel leakage. Moreover, we show how to achieve authenticated encryption that is simultaneously both misuse resistant and leakage resilient, based on a sufficiently leakage resilient PRF, and finally we propose a concrete, pairing-based, instantiation of the latter.

  21. Low Cost Constant Round MPCCombining BMR and Oblivious Transfer 2017 Asiacrypt GarbledCircuits MPC SecretSharing eprint.iacr.org
    Carmit Hazay, Peter Scholl, and Eduardo Soria-Vazquez

    In this work, we present two new universally composable, actively secure, constant round multi-party protocols for generating BMR garbled circuits with free-XOR and reduced costs.


    (1) Our first protocol takes a generic approach using any secret-sharing based MPC protocol for binary circuits, and a correlated oblivious transfer functionality.


    (2) Our specialized protocol uses secret-sharing based MPC with information-theoretic MACs. This approach is less general, but requires no additional correlated OTs to compute the garbled circuit.


    In both approaches, the underlying secret-sharing based protocol is only used for one secure F2


    multiplication per AND gate. An interesting consequence of this is that, with current techniques, constant round MPC for binary circuits is not much more expensive than practical, non-constant round protocols.


    We demonstrate the practicality of our second protocol with an implementation, and perform experiments with up to 9
    parties securely computing the AES and SHA-256 circuits. Our running times improve upon the best possible performance with previous BMR-based protocols by 60 times.

  22. Improving TFHE: faster packed homomorphicoperations and efficient circuit bootstrapping 2017 Asiacrypt FHE eprint.iacr.org
    Ilaria Chillotti and Nicolas Gama and Mariya Georgieva and Malika Izabachène

    In this paper, we present several methods to improve the evaluation of homomorphic functions, both for fully and for leveled homomorphic encryption. We propose two packing methods, in order to decrease the expansion factor and optimize the evaluation of look-up tables and random functions in TRGSW-based homomorphic schemes. We also extend the automata logic, introduced in [19, 12], to the efficient leveled evaluation of weighted automata, and present a new homomorphic counter called TBSR, that supports all the elementary operations that occur in a multiplication. These improvements speed-up the evaluation of most arithmetic functions in a packed leveled mode, with a noise overhead that remains additive. We finally present a new circuit bootstrapping that converts TLWE into low-noise TRGSW ciphertexts in just 137ms, which makes the leveled mode of TFHE composable, and which is fast enough to speed-up arithmetic functions, compared to the gate-by-gate bootstrapping given in [12]. Finally, we propose concrete parameter sets and timing comparison for all our constructions.

  23. Automatic Search of Bit-Based Division Property for ARX Ciphers and Word-Based Division Property 2017 Asiacrypt Attacks Cryptanalysis SymmetricKey eprint.iacr.org
    Ling Sun, Wei Wang, and Meiqin Wang

    Division property is a generalized integral property proposed by Todo at Eurocrypt 2015. Previous tools for automatic searching are mainly based on the Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) method and trace the division property propagation at the bit level. In this paper, we propose automatic tools to detect ARX ciphers’ division property at the bit level and some specific ciphers’ division property at the word level. For ARX ciphers, we construct the automatic searching tool relying on Boolean Satisfiability Problem (SAT) instead of MILP, since SAT method is more suitable in the search of ARX ciphers’ differential/linear characteristics. The propagation of division property is translated into a system of logical equations in Conjunctive Normal Form (CNF). Some logical equations can be dynamically adjusted according to different initial division properties and stopping rule, while the others corresponding to r-round propagations remain the same. Moreover, our approach can efficiently identify some optimized distinguishers with lower data complexity. As a result, we obtain a 17-round distinguisher for SHACAL-2, which gains four more rounds than previous work, and an 8-round distinguisher for LEA, which covers one more round than the former one. For word-based division property, we develop the automatic search based on Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT), which is a generalization of SAT. We model division property propagations of basic operations and S-boxes by logical formulas, and turn the searching problem into an SMT problem. With some available solvers, we achieve some new distinguishers. For CLEFIA, 10-round distinguishers are obtained, which cover one more round than the previous work. For the internal block cipher of Whirlpool, the data complexities of 4/5-round distinguishers are improved. For Rijndael-192 and Rijndael-256, 6-round distinguishers are presented, which attain two more rounds than the published ones. Besides, the integral attacks for CLEFIA are improved by one round with the newly obtained distinguishers.

  24. Improved Conditional Cube Attacks on KeccakKeyed Modes with MILP Method 2017 Asiacrypt Attacks Cryptanalysis SymmetricKey eprint.iacr.org
    Zheng Li, Wenquan Bi, Xiaoyang Dong, and Xiaoyun Wang

    Conditional cube attack is an efficient key-recovery attack on Keccak keyed modes proposed by Huang et al. at EUROCRYPT 2017. By assigning bit conditions, the diffusion of a conditional cube variable is reduced. Then, using a greedy algorithm (Algorithm 4 in Huang et al.’s paper), Huang et al. find some ordinary cube variables, that do not multiply together in the 1st round and do not multiply with the conditional cube variable in the 2nd round. Then the key-recovery attack is launched. The key part of conditional cube attack is to find enough ordinary cube variables. Note that, the greedy algorithm given by Huang et al. adds ordinary cube variable without considering its bad effect, i.e. the new ordinary cube variable may result in that many other variables could not be selected as ordinary cube variable (they multiply with the new ordinary cube variable in the first round).


    In this paper, we bring out a new MILP model to solve the above problem. We show how to model the CP-like-kernel and model the way that the ordinary cube variables do not multiply together in the 1st round as well as do not multiply with the conditional cube variable in the 2nd round. Based on these modeling strategies, a series of linear inequalities are given to restrict the way to add an ordinary cube variable. Then, by choosing the objective function of the maximal number of ordinary cube variables, we convert Huang et al.’s greedy algorithm into an MILP problem and the maximal ordinary cube variables are found.


    Using this new MILP tool, we improve Huang et al.’s key-recovery attacks on reduced-round Keccak-MAC-384 and Keccak-MAC-512 by 1 round, get the first 7-round and 6-round key-recovery attacks, respectively. For Ketje Major, we conclude that when the nonce is no less than 11 lanes, a 7-round key-recovery attack could be achieved. In addition, for Ketje Minor, we use conditional cube variable with 6-6-6 pattern to launch 7-round key-recovery attack.