Papers tagged as 2017
  1. Efficient Scalable Constant-Round MPC via Garbled Circuits 2017 Asiacrypt GarbledCircuits MPC eprint.iacr.org
    Aner Ben-Efraim and Yehuda Lindell and Eran Omri

    In the setting of secure multiparty computation, a set of mutually distrustful parties carry out a joint computation of their inputs, without revealing anything but the output. Over recent years, there has been tremendous progress towards making secure computation practical, with great success in the two-party case. In contrast, in the multiparty case, progress has been much slower, even for the case of semi-honest adversaries.


    In this paper, we consider the case of constant-round multiparty computation, via the garbled circuit approach of BMR (Beaver et al., STOC 1990). In recent work, it was shown that this protocol can be efficiently instantiated for semi-honest adversaries (Ben-Efraim et al., ACM CCS 2016). However, it scales very poorly with the number of parties, since the cost of garbled circuit evaluation is quadratic in the number of parties, per gate. Thus, for a large number of parties, it becomes expensive. We present a new way of constructing a BMR-type garbled circuit that can be evaluated with only a constant number of operations per gate. Our constructions use key-homomorphic pseudorandom functions (one based on DDH and the other on Ring-LWE) and are concretely efficient. In particular, for a large number of parties (e.g., 100), our new circuit can be evaluated faster than the standard BMR garbled circuit that uses only AES computations. Thus, our protocol is an important step towards achieving concretely efficient large-scale multiparty computation for Internet-like settings (where constant-round protocols are needed due to high latency).

  2. Instantaneous Decentralized Poker 2017 Asiacrypt Blockchains MPC SmartContracts eprint.iacr.org
    Iddo Bentov and Ranjit Kumaresan and Andrew Miller

    We present efficient protocols for amortized secure multiparty computation with penalties and secure cash distribution, of which poker is a prime example. Our protocols have an initial phase where the parties interact with a cryptocurrency network, that then enables them to interact only among themselves over the course of playing many poker games in which money changes hands. The high efficiency of our protocols is achieved by harnessing the power of stateful contracts. Compared to the limited expressive power of Bitcoin scripts, stateful contracts enable richer forms of interaction between standard secure computation and a cryptocurrency. We formalize the stateful contract model and the security notions that our protocols accomplish, and provide proofs in the simulation paradigm. Moreover, we provide a reference implementation in Ethereum/Solidity for the stateful contracts that our protocols are based on. We also adapt our off-chain cash distribution protocols to the special case of stateful duplex micropayment channels, which are of independent interest. In comparison to Bitcoin based payment channels, our duplex channel implementation is more efficient and has additional features.

  3. A simple and compact algorithm for SIDH with arbitrary degree isogenies 2017 Asiacrypt EllipticCurves PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Craig Costello and Huseyin Hisil

    We derive a new formula for computing arbitrary odd-degree isogenies between elliptic curves in Montgomery form. The formula lends itself to a simple and compact algorithm that can efficiently compute any low odd-degree isogenies inside the supersingular isogeny Diffie-Hellman (SIDH) key exchange protocol. Our implementation of this algorithm shows that, beyond the commonly used 3-isogenies, there is a moderate degradation in relative performance of (2d+1)-isogenies as d grows, but that larger values of d


    can now be used in practical SIDH implementations.


    We further show that the proposed algorithm can be used to both compute isogenies of curves and evaluate isogenies at points, unifying the two main types of functions needed for isogeny-based public-key cryptography. Together, these results open the door for practical SIDH on a much wider class of curves, and allow for simplified SIDH implementations that only need to call one general-purpose function inside the fundamental computation of the large degree secret isogenies.


    As an additional contribution, we also give new explicit formulas for 3- and 4-isogenies, and show that these give immediate speedups when substituted into pre-existing SIDH libraries.

  4. qDSA: Small and Secure Digital Signatureswith Curve-based Diffie–Hellman Key Pairs 2017 Asiacrypt EllipticCurves arxiv.org
    Joost Renes and Benjamin Smith

    qDSA is a high-speed, high-security signature scheme that facilitates implementations with a very small memory footprint, a crucial requirement for embedded systems and IoT devices, and that uses the same public keys as modern Diffie–Hellman schemes based on Montgomery curves (such as Curve25519) or Kummer surfaces. qDSA resembles an adaptation of EdDSA to the world of Kummer varieties, which are quotients of algebraic groups by ±1. Interestingly, qDSA does not require any full group operations or point recovery: all computations, including signature verification, occur on the quotient where there is no group law. We include details on four implementations of qDSA, using Montgomery and fast Kummer surface arithmetic on the 8-bit AVR ATmega and 32-bit ARM Cortex M0 platforms. We find that qDSA significantly outperforms state-of-the-art signature implementations in terms of stack usage and code size. We also include an efficient compression algorithm for points on fast Kummer surfaces, reducing them to the same size as compressed elliptic curve points for the same security level.

  5. A Post-Quantum Digital Signature Scheme Based on Supersingular Isogenies 2017 FinancialCryptography Isogenies PQC Signatures fc17.ifca.ai
    Youngho Yoo, Reza Azarderakhsh, Amir Jalali, David Jao, Vladimir Soukharev

    We present the first general-purpose digital signature scheme based on supersingular elliptic curve isogenies secure against quantum adversaries in the quantum random oracle model with small key sizes. This scheme is an application of Unruh’s construction of non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs to an interactive zero-knowledge proof proposed by De Feo, Jao, and Plût. We implement our proposed scheme on an x86-64 PC platform as well as an ARM-powered device. We exploit the state-of-the-art techniques to speed up the computations for general C and assembly. Finally, we provide timing results for real world applications.

  6. Faster Homomorphic Evaluation of Discrete Fourier Transforms 2017 FHE FinancialCryptography Privacy fc17.ifca.ai
    Anamaria Costache, Nigel P. Smart, Srinivas Vivek

    We present a methodology to achieve low latency homomorphic operations on approximations to complex numbers, by encoding a complex number as an evaluation of a polynomial at a root of unity. We then use this encoding to evaluate a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) on data which has been encrypted using a Somewhat Homomorphic Encryption (SHE) scheme, with up to three orders of magnitude improvement in latency over previous methods. We are also able to deal with much larger input sizes than previous methods. Due to the fact that the entire DFT algorithm is an algebraic operation over the underlying ring of the SHE scheme (for a suitably chosen ring), our method for the DFT utilizes exact arithmetic over the complex numbers, as opposed to approximations.

  7. An Efficient Pairing-Based Shuffle Argument 2017 Asiacrypt NIZK Pairings eprint.iacr.org
    Prastudy Fauzi and Helger Lipmaa and Janno Siim and Michal Zajac

    We construct the most efficient known pairing-based NIZK shuffle argument. It consists of three subarguments that were carefully chosen to obtain optimal efficiency of the shuffle argument:




    • A same-message argument based on the linear subspace QANIZK argument of Kiltz and Wee,




    • A (simplified) permutation matrix argument of Fauzi, Lipmaa, and Zając,




    • A (simplified) consistency argument of Groth and Lu.




    We prove the knowledge-soundness of the first two subarguments in the generic bilinear group model, and the culpable soundness of the third subargument under a KerMDH assumption. This proves the soundness of the shuffle argument. We also discuss our partially optimized implementation that allows one to prove a shuffle of 100000
    ciphertexts in less than a minute and verify it in less than 1.5 minutes.

  8. The First Thorough Side-Channel Hardware Trojan 2017 Asiacrypt Attacks SideChannels eprint.iacr.org
    Maik Ender, Samaneh Ghandali, Amir Moradi, and Christof Paar

    Hardware Trojans have gained high attention in academia, industry and by government agencies. The effective detection mechanisms and countermeasures against such malicious designs are only possible when there is a deep understanding of how hardware Trojans can be built in practice. In this work, we present a mechanism which shows how easily a stealthy hardware Trojan can be inserted in a provably-secure side-channel analysis protected implementation. Once the Trojan is triggered, the malicious design exhibits exploitable side-channel leakage leading to successful key recovery attacks. Such a Trojan does not add or remove any logic (even a single gate) to the design which makes it very hard to detect. In ASIC platforms, it is indeed inserted by subtle manipulations at the sub-transistor level to modify the parameters of a few transistors. The same is applicable on FPGA applications by changing the routing of particular signals, leading to null resource utilization overhead. The underlying concept is based on a secure masked hardware implementation which does not exhibit any detectable leakage. However, by running the device at a particular clock frequency one of the requirements of the underlying masking scheme is not fulfilled anymore, i.e., the Trojan is triggered, and the device’s side-channel leakage can be exploited. Although as a case study we show an application of our designed Trojan on an FPGA-based threshold implementation of the PRESENT cipher, our methodology is a general approach and can be applied on any similar circuit.

  9. Homomorphic Proxy Re-Authenticators and Applications to Verifiable Multi-User Data Aggregation 2017 DataAnalysis FinancialCryptography fc17.ifca.ai
    David Derler, Sebastian Ramacher, Daniel Slamanig

    We introduce the notion of homomorphic proxy re-authenticators, a tool that adds security and verifiability guarantees to multi-user data aggregation scenarios. It allows distinct sources to authenticate their data under their own keys, and a proxy can transform these single signatures or message authentication codes (MACs) to a MAC under a receiver’s key without having access to it. In addition, the proxy can evaluate arithmetic circuits (functions) on the inputs so that the resulting MAC corresponds to the evaluation of the respective function. As the messages authenticated by the sources may represent sensitive information, we also consider hiding them from the proxy and other parties in the system, except from the receiver.


    We provide a general model and two modular constructions of our novel primitive, supporting the class of linear functions. On our way, we establish various novel building blocks. Most interestingly, we formally define the notion and present a construction of homomorphic proxy re-encryption, which may be of independent interest. The latter allows users to encrypt messages under their own public keys, and a proxy can re-encrypt them to a receiver’s public key (without knowing any secret key), while also being able to evaluate functions on the ciphertexts. The resulting re-encrypted ciphertext then holds an evaluation of the function on the input messages.

  10. Consolidating Inner Product Masking 2017 Asiacrypt SideChannels eprint.iacr.org
    Josep Balasch and Sebastian Faust and Benedikt Gierlichs and Clara Paglialonga and François-Xavier Standaert

    Masking schemes are a prominent countermeasure to defeat power analysis attacks. One of their core ingredient is the encoding function. Due to its simplicity and comparably low complexity overheads,many masking schemes are based on a Boolean encoding. Yet, several recent works have proposed masking schemes that are based on alternative encoding functions. One such example is the inner product masking scheme that has been brought towards practice by recent research. In this work, we improve the practicality of the inner product masking scheme on multiple frontiers. On the conceptual level, we propose new algorithms that are significantly more efficient and have reduced randomness requirements, but remain secure in the t-probing model of Ishai, Sahai and Wagner (CRYPTO’03). On the practical level, we provide new implementation results. By exploiting several engineering tricks and combining them with our more efficient algorithms, we are able to reduce execution time by nearly 60% compared to earlier works. We complete our study by providing novel insights into the strength of the inner product masking using both the information theoretic evaluation framework of Standaert,Malkin and Yung (EUROCRYPT’09) and experimental analyses with an ARM microcontroller.

  11. Authenticated Encryption in the Face of Protocol and Side Channel Leakage 2017 Asiacrypt AuthenticatedEncryption Pairings SideChannels eprint.iacr.org
    Guy Barwell and Daniel P. Martin and Elisabeth Oswald and Martijn Stam

    Authenticated encryption schemes in practice have to be robust against adversaries that have access to various types of leakage, for instance decryption leakage on invalid ciphertexts (protocol leakage), or leakage on the underlying primitives (side channel leakage). This work includes several novel contributions: we augment the notion of nonce-base authenticated encryption with the notion of continuous leakage and we prove composition results in the face of protocol and side channel leakage. Moreover, we show how to achieve authenticated encryption that is simultaneously both misuse resistant and leakage resilient, based on a sufficiently leakage resilient PRF, and finally we propose a concrete, pairing-based, instantiation of the latter.

  12. A New Distribution-Sensitive Secure Sketch and Popularity-Proportional Hashing 2017 Crypto Hashing eprint.iacr.org
    Joanne Woodage and Rahul Chatterjee and Yevgeniy Dodis and Ari Juels and Thomas Ristenpart

    Motivated by typo correction in password authentication, we investigate cryptographic error-correction of secrets in settings where the distribution of secrets is a priori (approximately) known. We refer to this as the distribution-sensitive setting.


    We design a new secure sketch called the layer-hiding hash (LHH) that offers the best security to date. Roughly speaking, we show that LHH saves an additional log H_0(W) bits of entropy compared to the recent layered sketch construction due to Fuller, Reyzin, and Smith (FRS). Here H_0(W) is the size of the support of the distribution W. When supports are large, as with passwords, our new construction offers a substantial security improvement.


    We provide two new constructions of typo-tolerant password-based authentication schemes. The first combines a LHH or FRS sketch with a standard slow-to-compute hash function, and the second avoids secure sketches entirely, correcting typos instead by checking all nearby passwords. Unlike the previous such brute-force-checking construction, due to Chatterjee et al., our new construction uses a hash function whose run-time is proportional to the popularity of the password (forcing a longer hashing time on more popular, lower entropy passwords). We refer to this as popularity-proportional hashing (PPH). We then introduce a frame-work for comparing different typo-tolerant authentication approaches. We show that PPH always offers a better time / security trade-off than the LHH and FRS constructions, and for certain distributions outperforms the Chatterjee et al. construction. Elsewhere, this latter construction offers the best trade-off. In aggregate our results suggest that the best known secure sketches are still inferior to simpler brute-force based approaches.

  13. New Collision Attacks on Round-Reduced Keccak 2017 Attacks Eurocrypt Hashing eprint.iacr.org
    Kexin Qiao, Ling Song, Meicheng Liu, and Jian Guo

    In this paper, we focus on collision attacks against Keccak hash function family and some of its variants. Following the framework developed by Dinur et al. at FSE~2012 where 4-round collisions were found by combining 3-round differential trails and 1-round connectors, we extend the connectors one round further hence achieve collision attacks for up to 5 rounds. The extension is possible thanks to the large degree of freedom of the wide internal state. By linearization of all S-boxes of the first round, the problem of finding solutions of 2-round connectors are converted to that of solving a system of linear equations. However, due to the quick freedom reduction from the linearization, the system has solution only when the 3-round differential trails satisfy some additional conditions. We develop a dedicated differential trail search strategy and find such special differentials indeed exist. As a result, the first practical collision attack against 5-round SHAKE128 and two 5-round instances of the Keccak collision challenges are found with real examples. We also give the first results against 5-round Keccak224 and 6-round Keccak collision challenges. It is remarked that the work here is still far from threatening the security of the full 24-round Keccak family.

  14. Low Cost Constant Round MPCCombining BMR and Oblivious Transfer 2017 Asiacrypt GarbledCircuits MPC SecretSharing eprint.iacr.org
    Carmit Hazay, Peter Scholl, and Eduardo Soria-Vazquez

    In this work, we present two new universally composable, actively secure, constant round multi-party protocols for generating BMR garbled circuits with free-XOR and reduced costs.


    (1) Our first protocol takes a generic approach using any secret-sharing based MPC protocol for binary circuits, and a correlated oblivious transfer functionality.


    (2) Our specialized protocol uses secret-sharing based MPC with information-theoretic MACs. This approach is less general, but requires no additional correlated OTs to compute the garbled circuit.


    In both approaches, the underlying secret-sharing based protocol is only used for one secure F2


    multiplication per AND gate. An interesting consequence of this is that, with current techniques, constant round MPC for binary circuits is not much more expensive than practical, non-constant round protocols.


    We demonstrate the practicality of our second protocol with an implementation, and perform experiments with up to 9
    parties securely computing the AES and SHA-256 circuits. Our running times improve upon the best possible performance with previous BMR-based protocols by 60 times.

  15. PRF-ODH: Relations, Instantiations, and Impossibility Results 2017 Crypto PRF eprint.iacr.org
    Jacqueline Brendel and Marc Fischlin and Felix Günther and Christian Janson

    The pseudorandom-function oracle-Diffie–Hellman (PRF-ODH) assumption has been introduced recently to analyze a variety of DH-based key exchange protocols, including TLS 1.2 and the TLS 1.3 candidates, as well as the extended access control (EAC) protocol. Remarkably, the assumption comes in different flavors in these settings and none of them has been scrutinized comprehensively yet. In this paper here we therefore present a systematic study of the different PRF-ODH variants in the literature. In particular, we analyze their strengths relative to each other, carving out that the variants form a hierarchy. We further investigate the boundaries between instantiating the assumptions in the standard model and the random oracle model. While we show that even the strongest variant is achievable in the random oracle model under the strong Diffie–Hellman assumption, we provide a negative result showing that it is implausible to instantiate even the weaker variants in the standard model via algebraic black-box reductions to common cryptographic problems.

  16. Hashing Garbled Circuits for Free 2017 Eurocrypt GarbledCircuits Hashing MPC eprint.iacr.org
    Xiong Fan, Chaya Ganesh, and Vladimir Kolesnikov

    We introduce {\em Free Hash}, a new approach to generating Garbled Circuit (GC) hash at no extra cost during GC generation. This is in contrast with state-of-the-art approaches, which hash GCs at computational cost of up to 6× of GC generation. GC hashing is at the core of the cut-and-choose technique of GC-based secure function evaluation (SFE).


    Our main idea is to intertwine hash generation/verification with GC generation and evaluation. While we {\em allow} an adversary to generate a GC \GCˆ whose hash collides with an honestly generated \GC, such a \GCˆ w.h.p. will fail evaluation and cheating will be discovered. Our GC hash is simply a (slightly modified) XOR of all the gate table rows of GC. It is compatible with Free XOR and half-gates garbling, and can be made to work with many cut-and-choose SFE protocols.


    With today’s network speeds being not far behind hardware-assisted fixed-key garbling throughput, eliminating the GC hashing cost will significantly improve SFE performance. Our estimates show substantial cost reduction in typical settings, and up to factor 6 in specialized applications relying on GC hashes.


    We implemented GC hashing algorithm and report on its performance.

  17. A Formal Treatment of Multi-key Channels 2017 Crypto SecureChannels eprint.iacr.org
    Felix Günther and Sogol Mazaheri

    Secure channel protocols protect data transmission over a network from being overheard or tampered with. In the common abstraction, cryptographic models for channels involve a single key for ensuring the central security notions of confidentiality and integrity. The currently developed next version of the Transport Layer Security protocol, TLS 1.3, however introduces a key updating mechanism in order to deploy a sequence of multiple, possibly independent encryption keys in its channel sub-protocol. This design aims at achieving forward security, protecting prior communication after long-term key corruption, as well as security of individual channel phases even if the key in other phases is leaked (a property we denote as phase-key insulation). Neither of these security aspects has been treated formally in the context of cryptographic channels so far, leading to a current lack of techniques to evaluate such channel designs cryptographically.


    We approach this gap by introducing the first formal model of multi-key channels, where sender and receiver can update their shared secret key during the lifetime of the channel without interrupting the communication. We present modular, game-based notions for confidentiality and integrity, integrating forward security and phase-key insulation as two advanced security aspects. As we show, our framework of notions on the lower end of its hierarchy naturally connects to the existing notions of stateful encryption established for single-key channels. Like for classical channels, it further allows for generically composing chosen-ciphertext confidentiality from chosen-plaintext confidentiality and ciphertext integrity. We instantiate the strongest security notions in our model with a construction based on authenticated encryption with associated data and a pseudorandom function. Being comparatively close, our construction additionally enables us to discuss the TLS 1.3 record protocol design.

  18. Efficient compression of SIDH public keys 2017 Diffie-Hellman EllipticCurves Eurocrypt Isogenies PQC eprint.iacr.org
    Craig Costello, David Jao, Patrick Longa, Michael Naehrig, Joost Renes, and David Urbanik

    Supersingular isogeny Diffie-Hellman (SIDH) is an attractive candidate for post-quantum key exchange, in large part due to its relatively small public key sizes. A recent paper by Azarderakhsh, Jao, Kalach, Koziel and Leonardi showed that the public keys defined in Jao and De Feo’s original SIDH scheme can be further compressed by around a factor of two, but reported that the performance penalty in utilizing this compression blew the overall SIDH runtime out by more than an order of magnitude. Given that the runtime of SIDH key exchange is currently its main drawback in relation to its lattice- and code-based post-quantum alternatives, an order of magnitude performance penalty for a factor of two improvement in bandwidth presents a trade-off that is unlikely to favor public-key compression in many scenarios.


    In this paper, we propose a range of new algorithms and techniques that accelerate SIDH public-key compression by more than an order of magnitude, making it roughly as fast as a round of standalone SIDH key exchange, while further reducing the size of the compressed public keys by approximately 12.5%. These improvements enable the practical use of compression, achieving public keys of only 330 bytes for the concrete parameters used to target 128 bits of quantum security and further strengthens SIDH as a promising post-quantum primitive.

  19. Leakage-Abuse Attacks against Order-Revealing Encryption 2017 Attacks EncryptedDatabases Oakland eprint.iacr.org
    Paul Grubbs, Kevin Sekniqi, Vincent Bindschaedler, Muhammad Naveed and Thomas Ristenpart

    Order-preserving encryption and its generalization order-revealing encryption (OPE/ORE) are used in a variety of settings in practice in order to allow sorting, performing range queries, and filtering data — all while only having access to ciphertexts. But OPE and ORE ciphertexts necessarily leak information about plaintexts, and what level of security they provide has been unclear. In this work, we introduce new leakage-abuse attacks that show how to recover plaintexts from OPE/ORE-encrypted databases. Underlying our new attacks against practically-used schemes is a framework in which we cast the adversary’s challenge as a non- crossing bipartite matching problem. This allows easy tailoring of attacks to a specific scheme’s leakage profile. In a case study of customer records, we show attacks that recover 99% of first names, 97% of last names, and 90% of birthdates held in a database, despite all values being encrypted with the OPE scheme most widely used in practice. We also show the first attack against the recent frequency- hiding Kerschbaum scheme, to which no prior attacks have been demonstrated. Our attack recovers frequently occurring plaintexts most of the time.

  20. Boolean Searchable Symmetric Encryption with Worst-Case Sub-Linear Complexity 2017 Eurocrypt SearchableEncryption eprint.iacr.org
    Seny Kamara and Tarik Moataz

    Recent work on searchable symmetric encryption (SSE) has focused on increasing its expressiveness. A notable example is the OXT construction (Cash et al., CRYPTO ’13 ) which is the first SSE scheme to support conjunctive keyword queries with sub-linear search complexity. While OXT efficiently supports disjunctive and boolean queries that can be expressed in searchable normal form, it can only handle arbitrary disjunctive and boolean queries in linear time. This motivates the problem of designing expressive SSE schemes with worst-case sub-linear search; that is, schemes that remain highly efficient for any keyword query.


    In this work, we address this problem and propose non-interactive highly efficient SSE schemes that handle arbitrary disjunctive and boolean queries with worst-case sub-linear search and optimal communication complexity. Our main construction, called IEX, makes black-box use of an underlying single keyword SSE scheme which we can instantiate in various ways. Our first instantiation, IEX-2Lev, makes use of the recent 2Lev construction (Cash et al., NDSS ’14 ) and is optimized for search at the expense of storage overhead. Our second instantiation, IEX-ZMF, relies on a new single keyword SSE scheme we introduce called ZMF and is optimized for storage overhead at the expense of efficiency (while still achieving asymptotically sub-linear search). Our ZMF construction is the first adaptively-secure highly compact SSE scheme and may be of independent interest. At a very high level, it can be viewed as an encrypted version of a new Bloom filter variant we refer to as a Matryoshka filter. In addition, we show how to extend IEX to be dynamic and forward-secure.


    To evaluate the practicality of our schemes, we designed and implemented a new encrypted search framework called Clusion. Our experimental results demonstrate the practicality of IEX and of its instantiations with respect to either search (for IEX-2Lev) and storage overhead (for IEX-ZMF).

  21. Hedging Public-Key Encryption in the Real World 2017 Crypto PublicKeyEncryption eprint.iacr.org
    Alexandra Boldyreva and Christopher Patton and Thomas Shrimpton

    Hedged PKE schemes are designed to provide useful security when the per-message randomness fails to be uniform, say, due to faulty implementations or adversarial actions. A simple and elegant theoretical approach to building such schemes works like this: Synthesize fresh random bits by hashing all of the encryption inputs, and use the resulting hash output as randomness for an underlying PKE scheme. The idea actually goes back to the Fujisaki-Okamoto transform for turning CPA-secure encryption into CCA-secure encryption, and is also used to build deterministic PKE schemes.


    In practice, implementing this simple construction is surprisingly difficult, as the high- and mid-level APIs presented by the most commonly used crypto libraries (e.g. OpenSSL and forks thereof) do not permit one to specify the per-encryption randomness. Thus application developers are forced to piece together low-level functionalities and attend to any associated, security-critical algorithmic choices. Other approaches to hedged PKE present similar problems in practice.


    We reconsider the matter of building hedged PKE schemes, and the security notions they aim to achieve. We lift the current best-possible security notion for hedged PKE (IND-CDA) from the CPA setting to the CCA setting, and then show how to achieve it using primitives that are readily available from high-level APIs. We also propose a new security notion, MM-CCA, which generalizes traditional IND-CCA to admit imperfect randomness. Like IND-CCA, and unlike IND-CDA, our notion gives the adversary the public key. We show that MM-CCA is achieved by RSA-OAEP in the random-oracle model; this is significant in practice because RSA-OAEP is directly available from high-level APIs across all libraries we surveyed. We sort out relationships among the various notions, and also develop new results for existing hedged PKE constructions.

  22. Comparing the Usability of Cryptographic APIs 2017 Oakland UsableCryptography cl.cam.ac.uk
    Yasemin Acar, Michael Backes, Sascha Fahl, Simson Garfinkel, Doowon Kim, Michelle L. Mazurek, and Christian Stransky

    Potentially dangerous cryptography errors are well-documented in many applications. Conventional wisdom suggests that many of these errors are caused by cryptographic Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that are too complicated, have insecure defaults, or are poorly documented. To address this problem, researchers have created several cryptographic libraries that they claim are more usable, however, none of these libraries have been empirically evaluated for their ability to promote more secure development. This paper is the first to examine both how and why the design and resulting usability of different cryptographic libraries affects the security of code written with them, with the goal of understanding how to build effective future libraries. We conducted a controlled experiment in which 256 Python developers recruited from GitHub attempt common tasks involving symmetric and asymmetric cryptography using one of five different APIs. We examine their resulting code for functional correctness and security, and compare their results to their self-reported sentiment about their assigned library. Our results suggest that while APIs designed for simplicity can provide security benefits - reducing the decision space, as expected, prevents choice of insecure parameters - simplicity is not enough. Poor documentation, missing code examples, and a lack of auxiliary features such as secure key storage, caused even participants assigned to simplified libraries to struggle with both basic functional correctness and security. Surprisingly, the availability of comprehensive documentation and easy-to-use code examples seems to compensate for more complicated APIs in terms of functionally correct results and participant reactions, however, this did not extend to security results. We find it particularly concerning that for about 20% of functionally correct tasks, across libraries, participants believed their code was secure when it was not. Our results suggest that while new cryptographic libraries that want to promote effective security should offer a simple, convenient interface, this is not enough: they should also, and perhaps more importantly, ensure support for a broad range of common tasks and provide accessible documentation with secure, easy-to-use code examples.

  23. Anonymous Attestation with Subverted TPMs 2017 Crypto eprint.iacr.org
    Jan Camenisch, Manu Drijvers, Anja Lehmann

    Various sources have revealed that cryptographic standards and components have been subverted to undermine the security of users, reigniting research on means to achieve security in presence of such subverted components. In this paper we consider direct anonymous attestation (DAA) in this respect. This standardized protocol allows a computer with the help of an embedded TPM chip to remotely attest that it is in a healthy state. Guaranteeing that different attestations by the same computer cannot be linked was an explicit and important design goal of the standard in order to protect the privacy of the user of the computer. Surprisingly, none of the standardized or otherwise proposed DAA protocols achieves privacy when the TPM is subverted, but they all rely on the honesty of the TPM. As the TPM is a piece of hardware, it is hardly possible to tell whether or not a given TPM follows the specified protocol. In this paper we study this setting and provide a new protocol that achieves privacy also in presence of subverted TPMs.

  24. SoK: Cryptographically Protected Database Search 2017 EncryptedDatabases Oakland SOK arxiv.org
    Benjamin Fuller, Mayank Varia, Arkady Yerukhimovich, Emily Shen, Ariel Hamlin, Vijay Gadepally, Richard Shay, John Darby Mitchell, and Robert K. Cunningham

    Protected database search systems cryptographically isolate the roles of reading from, writing to, and administering the database. This separation limits unnecessary administrator access and protects data in the case of system breaches. Since protected search was introduced in 2000, the area has grown rapidly; systems are offered by academia, start-ups, and established companies.
    However, there is no best protected search system or set of techniques. Design of such systems is a balancing act between security, functionality, performance, and usability. This challenge is made more difficult by ongoing database specialization, as some users will want the functionality of SQL, NoSQL, or NewSQL databases. This database evolution will continue, and the protected search community should be able to quickly provide functionality consistent with newly invented databases.
    At the same time, the community must accurately and clearly characterize the tradeoffs between different approaches. To address these challenges, we provide the following contributions:



    1. An identification of the important primitive operations across database paradigms. We find there are a small number of base operations that can be used and combined to support a large number of database paradigms.

    2. An evaluation of the current state of protected search systems in implementing these base operations. This evaluation describes the main approaches and tradeoffs for each base operation. Furthermore, it puts protected search in the context of unprotected search, identifying key gaps in functionality.

    3. An analysis of attacks against protected search for different base queries.

    4. A roadmap and tools for transforming a protected search system into a protected database, including an open-source performance evaluation platform and initial user opinions of protected search.

  25. Improving TFHE: faster packed homomorphicoperations and efficient circuit bootstrapping 2017 Asiacrypt FHE eprint.iacr.org
    Ilaria Chillotti and Nicolas Gama and Mariya Georgieva and Malika Izabachène

    In this paper, we present several methods to improve the evaluation of homomorphic functions, both for fully and for leveled homomorphic encryption. We propose two packing methods, in order to decrease the expansion factor and optimize the evaluation of look-up tables and random functions in TRGSW-based homomorphic schemes. We also extend the automata logic, introduced in [19, 12], to the efficient leveled evaluation of weighted automata, and present a new homomorphic counter called TBSR, that supports all the elementary operations that occur in a multiplication. These improvements speed-up the evaluation of most arithmetic functions in a packed leveled mode, with a noise overhead that remains additive. We finally present a new circuit bootstrapping that converts TLWE into low-noise TRGSW ciphertexts in just 137ms, which makes the leveled mode of TFHE composable, and which is fast enough to speed-up arithmetic functions, compared to the gate-by-gate bootstrapping given in [12]. Finally, we propose concrete parameter sets and timing comparison for all our constructions.