1. Efficient Constructions for Almost-everywhere Secure Computation 2020 Eurocrypt MPC eprint.iacr.org
    Siddhartha Jayanti, Srinivasan Raghuraman and Nikhil Vyas

    The importance of efficient MPC in today’s world needs no retelling. An obvious barebones requirement to execute protocols for MPC is the ability of parties to communicate with each other. Traditionally, we solve this problem by assuming that every pair of parties in the network share a dedicated secure link that enables reliable message transmission. This assumption is clearly impractical as the number of nodes in the network grows, as it has today. In their seminal work, Dwork, Peleg, Pippenger and Upfal introduced the notion of almost-everywhere secure primitives in an effort to model the reality of large scale global networks and study the impact of limited connectivity on the properties of fundamental fault-tolerant distributed tasks. In this model, the underlying communication network is sparse and hence some nodes may not even be in a position to participate in the protocol (all their neighbors may be corrupt, for instance). A protocol for almost everywhere reliable message transmission, which would guarantee that a large subset of the network can transmit messages to each other reliably, implies a protocol for almost-everywhere agreement where nodes are required to agree on a value despite malicious or byzantine behavior of some subset of nodes, and an almost-everywhere agreement protocol implies a protocol almost-everywhere secure MPC that is unconditionally or information-theoretically secure. The parameters of interest are the degree d of the network, the number t of corrupted nodes that can be tolerated and the number x of nodes that the protocol may give up. Prior work achieves d=O(1) for t=O(n/logn) and d=O(logqn) for t=O(n) for some fixed constant q>1.


    In this work, we first derive message protocols which are efficient with respect to the total number of computations done across the network. We use this result to show an abundance of networks with d=O(1) that are resilient to t=O(n) random corruptions. This randomized result helps us build networks which are resistant to worst-case adversaries. In particular, we improve the state of the art in the almost everywhere reliable message transmission problem in the worst-case adversary model by showing the existence of an abundance of networks that satisfy d=O(logn) for t=O(n), thus making progress on this question after nearly a decade. Finally, we define a new adversarial model of corruptions that is suitable for networks shared amongst a large group of corporations that: (1) do not trust each other, and (2) may collude, and construct optimal networks achieving d=O(1) for t=O(n) in this model.

  2. Formalizing Data Deletion in the Context of the Right to be Forgotten 2020 Eurocrypt eprint.iacr.org
    Sanjam Garg, Shafi Goldwasser and Prashant Nalini Vasudevan

    The right of an individual to request the deletion of their personal data by an entity that might be storing it – referred to as the right to be forgotten – has been explicitly recognized, legislated, and exercised in several jurisdictions across the world, including the European Union, Argentina, and California. However, much of the discussion surrounding this right offers only an intuitive notion of what it means for it to be fulfilled – of what it means for such personal data to be deleted. In this work, we provide a formal definitional framework for the right to be forgotten using tools and paradigms from cryptography. In particular, we provide a precise definition of what could be (or should be) expected from an entity that collects individuals’ data when a request is made of it to delete some of this data. Our framework captures several, though not all, relevant aspects of typical systems involved in data processing. While it cannot be viewed as expressing the statements of current laws (especially since these are rather vague in this respect), our work offers technically precise definitions that represent possibilities for what the law could reasonably expect, and alternatives for what future versions of the law could explicitly require. Finally, with the goal of demonstrating the applicability of our framework and definitions, we consider various natural and simple scenarios where the right to be forgotten comes up. For each of these scenarios, we highlight the pitfalls that arise even in genuine attempts at implementing systems offering deletion guarantees, and also describe technological solutions that provably satisfy our definitions. These solutions bring together techniques built by various communities.

  3. Friet: An Authenticated Encryption Scheme with Built-in Fault Detection 2020 AuthenticatedEncryption Eurocrypt SymmetricKey eprint.iacr.org
    Thierry Simon, Lejla Batina, Joan Daemen, Vincent Grosso, Pedro Maat Costa Massolino, Kostas Papagiannopoulos, Francesco Regazzoni, and Niels Samwel

    In this work we present a duplex-based authenticated encryption scheme Friet based on a new permutation called Friet-P. We designed Friet-P with a novel approach for cryptographic permutations and block ciphers that takes fault-attack resistance into account and that we introduce in this paper. In this method, we build a permutation fC to be embedded in a larger one, f . First, we define f as a sequence of steps that all abide a chosen error-correcting code C, i.e., that map C-codewords to C-codewords. Then, we embed fC in f by first encoding its input to an element of C, applying f and then decoding back from C. This last step detects a fault when the output of f is not in C. We motivate the design of the permutation we use in Friet and report on performance in soft- and hardware. We evaluate the fault-detection capabilities of the software and simulated hardware implementations with attacks. Finally, we perform a leakage evaluation. Our code is available at https://github.com/thisimon/Friet.git.

  4. Everybody's a Target: Scalability in Public-Key Encryption 2020 EllipticCurves Eurocrypt PKI PublicKeyEncryption eprint.iacr.org
    Benedikt Auerbach, Federico Giacon and Eike Kiltz

    For 1≤m≤n, we consider a natural m-out-of-n multi-instance scenario for a public-key encryption (PKE) scheme. An adversary, given n independent instances of PKE, wins if he breaks at least m out of the n instances. In this work, we are interested in the scaling factor of PKE schemes, SF, which measures how well the difficulty of breaking m out of the n instances scales in m. That is, a scaling factor SF=ℓ indicates that breaking m out of n instances is at least ℓ times more difficult than breaking one single instance. A PKE scheme with small scaling factor hence provides an ideal target for mass surveillance. In fact, the Logjam attack (CCS 2015) implicitly exploited, among other things, an almost constant scaling factor of ElGamal over finite fields (with shared group parameters).


    For Hashed ElGamal over elliptic curves, we use the generic group model to argue that the scaling factor depends on the scheme’s granularity. In low granularity, meaning each public key contains its independent group parameter, the scheme has optimal scaling factor SF=m; In medium and high granularity, meaning all public keys share the same group parameter, the scheme still has a reasonable scaling factor SF=m−−√. Our findings underline that instantiating ElGamal over elliptic curves should be preferred to finite fields in a multi-instance scenario.


    As our main technical contribution, we derive new generic-group lower bounds of Ω(mp−−−√) on the difficulty of solving both the m-out-of-n Gap Discrete Logarithm and the m-out-of-n Gap Computational Diffie-Hellman problem over groups of prime order p, extending a recent result by Yun (EUROCRYPT 2015). We establish the lower bound by studying the hardness of a related computational problem which we call the search-by-hypersurface problem.

  5. Blind Schnorr Signatures in the Algebraic Group Model 2020 Eurocrypt Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Georg Fuchsbauer, Antoine Plouviez and Yannick Seurin

    We study the security of schemes related to Schnorr signatures in the algebraic group model (AGM) proposed by Fuchsbauer, Kiltz, and Loss (CRYPTO 2018), where the adversary can only compute new group elements by applying the group operation. Schnorr signatures can be proved secure in the random oracle model (ROM) under the discrete logarithm assumption (DL) by rewinding the adversary; but this security proof is loose. We start with giving a tight security proof under DL in the combination of the AGM and the ROM. Our main focus are blind Schnorr signatures, whose only known security proof is in the combination of the ROM and the generic group model, under the assumption that the so-called ROS problem is hard. We show that in the AGM+ROM the scheme is secure assuming hardness of the one-more discrete logarithm problem and the ROS problem. As the latter can be solved in sub-exponential time using Wagner’s algorithm, this is not entirely satisfying. Hence, we then propose a very simple modification of the scheme (which leaves key generation and signature verification unchanged) and show that, instead of ROS, its security relies on the hardness of a related problem which appears much harder than ROS. Finally, we give a tight reduction of the CCA2 security of Schnorr-signed ElGamal key encapsulation to DL, again in the AGM+ROM.

  6. Compact NIZKs from Standard Assumptions on Bilinear Maps 2020 Eurocrypt NIZK eprint.iacr.org
    Shuichi Katsumata, Ryo Nishimaki, Shota Yamada and Takashi Yamakawa

    A non-interactive zero-knowledge (NIZK) protocol enables a prover to convince a verifier of the truth of a statement without leaking any other information by sending a single message. The main focus of this work is on exploring short pairing-based NIZKs for all NP languages based on standard assumptions. In this regime, the seminal work of Groth, Ostrovsky, and Sahai (J.ACM’12) (GOS-NIZK) is still considered to be the state-of-the-art. Although fairly efficient, one drawback of GOS-NIZK is that the proof size is multiplicative in the circuit size computing the NP relation. That is, the proof size grows by O(|C|λ), where C is the circuit for the NP relation and λ is the security parameter. By now, there have been numerous follow-up works focusing on shortening the proof size of pairing-based NIZKs, however, thus far, all works come at the cost of relying either on a non-standard knowledge-type assumption or a non-static q-type assumption. Specifically, improving the proof size of the original GOS-NIZK under the same standard assumption has remained as an open problem.


    Our main result is a construction of a pairing-based NIZK for all of NP whose proof size is additive in |C|, that is, the proof size only grows by |C|+\poly(λ), based on the decisional linear (DLIN) assumption. Since the DLIN assumption is the same assumption underlying GOS-NIZK, our NIZK is a strict improvement on their proof size.


    As by-products of our main result, we also obtain the following two results: (1) We construct a perfectly zero-knowledge NIZK (NIPZK) for NP relations computable in NC1 with proof size |w|⋅\poly(λ) where |w| is the witness length based on the DLIN assumption. This is the first pairing-based NIPZK for a non-trivial class of NP languages whose proof size is independent of |C| based on a standard assumption. (2)~We construct a universally composable (UC) NIZK for NP relations computable in NC1 in the erasure-free adaptive setting whose proof size is |w|⋅\poly(λ) from the DLIN assumption. This is an improvement over the recent result of Katsumata, Nishimaki, Yamada, and Yamakawa (CRYPTO’19), which gave a similar result based on a non-static q-type assumption.


    The main building block for all of our NIZKs is a constrained signature scheme with decomposable online-offline efficiency. This is a property which we newly introduce in this paper and construct from the DLIN assumption. We believe this construction is of an independent interest.

  7. Private Aggregation from Fewer Anonymous Messages 2020 DifferentialPrivacy Eurocrypt Privacy arxiv.org
    Badih Ghazi, Pasin Manurangsi, Rasmus Pagh, Ameya Velingker

    Consider the setup where $n$ parties are each given a number $x_i \in \mathbb{F}_q$ and the goal is to compute the sum $\sum_i x_i$ in a secure fashion and with as little communication as possible. We study this problem in the anonymized model of Ishai et al. (FOCS 2006) where each party may broadcast anonymous messages on an insecure channel.
    We present a new analysis of the one-round “split and mix” protocol of Ishai et al. In order to achieve the same security parameter, our analysis reduces the required number of messages by a $\Theta(\log n)$ multiplicative factor. We complement our positive result with lower bounds showing that the dependence of the number of messages on the domain size, the number of parties, and the security parameter is essentially tight.
    Using a reduction of Balle et al. (2019), our improved analysis of the protocol of Ishai et al. yields, in the same model, an $\left(\varepsilon, \delta\right)$-differentially private protocol for aggregation that, for any constant $\varepsilon > 0$ and any $\delta = \frac{1}{\mathrm{poly}(n)}$, incurs only a constant error and requires only a constant number of messages per party. Previously, such a protocol was known only for $\Omega(\log n)$ messages per party.

  8. Implementing Grover oracles for quantum key search on AES and LowMC 2020 Attacks Eurocrypt QuantumAttacks SymmetricKey eprint.iacr.org
    Samuel Jaques, Michael Naehrig, Martin Roetteler and Fernando Virdia

    Grover’s search algorithm gives a quantum attack against block ciphers by searching for a key that matches a small number of plaintext-ciphertext pairs. This attack uses O(N−−√) calls to the cipher to search a key space of size N. Previous work in the specific case of AES derived the full gate cost by analyzing quantum circuits for the cipher, but focused on minimizing the number of qubits. In contrast, we study the cost of quantum key search attacks under a depth restriction and introduce techniques that reduce the oracle depth, even if it requires more qubits. As cases in point, we design quantum circuits for the block ciphers AES and LowMC. Our circuits give a lower overall attack cost in both the gate count and depth-times-width cost models. In NIST’s post-quantum cryptography standardization process, security categories are defined based on the concrete cost of quantum key search against AES. We present new, lower cost estimates for each category, so our work has immediate implications for the security assessment of post-quantum cryptography. As part of this work, we release Q# implementations of the full Grover oracle for AES-128, -192, -256 and for the three LowMC instantiations used in \picnic, including unit tests and code to reproduce our quantum resource estimates. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first two such full implementations and automatic resource estimations.

  9. Private Information Retrieval with Sublinear Online Time 2020 Eurocrypt PIR eprint.iacr.org
    Henry Corrigan-Gibbs and Dmitry Kogan

    We present the first protocols for private information retrieval that allow fast (sublinear-time) database lookups without increasing the server-side storage requirements. To achieve these efficiency goals, our protocols work in an offline/online model. In an offline phase, which takes place before the client has decided which database bit it wants to read, the client fetches a short string from the servers. In a subsequent online phase, the client can privately retrieve its desired bit of the database by making a second query to the servers. By pushing the bulk of the server-side computation into the offline phase (which is independent of the client’s query), our protocols allow the online phase to complete very quickly—in time sublinear in the size of the database. Our protocols can provide statistical security in the two-server setting and computational security in the single-server setting. Finally, we prove that, in this model, our protocols are optimal in terms of the trade-off they achieve between communication and running time.

  10. Security under Message-Derived Keys: Signcryption in iMessage 2020 AuthenticatedEncryption Eurocrypt PublicKeyEncryption SecureMessaging SymmetricKey eprint.iacr.org
    Mihir Bellare and Igors Stepanovs

    At the core of Apple’s iMessage is a signcryption scheme that involves symmetric encryption of a message under a key that is derived from the message itself. This motivates us to formalize a primitive we call Encryption under Message-Derived Keys (EMDK). We prove security of the EMDK scheme underlying iMessage. We use this to prove security of the signcryption scheme itself, with respect to definitions of signcryption we give that enhance prior ones to cover issues peculiar to messaging protocols. Our provable-security results are quantitative, and we discuss the practical implications for iMessage.

  11. PSI from PaXoS: Fast, Malicious Private Set Intersection 2020 Eurocrypt PSI eprint.iacr.org
    Benny Pinkas, Mike Rosulek and Ni Trieu and Avishay Yanai

    We present a 2-party private set intersection (PSI) protocol which provides security against malicious participants, yet is almost as fast as the fastest known semi-honest PSI protocol of Kolesnikov et al. (CCS 2016).


    Our protocol is based on a new approach for two-party PSI, which can be instantiated to provide security against either malicious or semi-honest adversaries. The protocol is unique in that the only difference between the semi-honest and malicious versions is an instantiation with different parameters for a linear error-correction code. It is also the first PSI protocol which is concretely efficient while having linear communication and security against malicious adversaries, while running in the OT-hybrid model (assuming a non-programmable random oracle).


    State of the art semi-honest PSI protocols take advantage of cuckoo hashing, but it has proven a challenge to use cuckoo hashing for malicious security. Our protocol is the first to use cuckoo hashing for malicious-secure PSI. We do so via a new data structure, called a probe-and-XOR of strings (PaXoS), which may be of independent interest. This abstraction captures important properties of previous data structures, most notably garbled Bloom filters. While an encoding by a garbled Bloom filter is larger by a factor of $O(\lambda)$ than the original data, we describe a significantly improved PaXoS based on cuckoo hashing that achieves constant rate while being no worse in other relevant efficiency measures.

  12. Stacked Garbling for Disjunctive Zero-Knowledge Proofs 2020 Eurocrypt GarbledCircuits ZK eprint.iacr.org
    David Heath and Vladimir Kolesnikov

    Zero-knowledge (ZK) proofs (ZKP) have received wide attention, focusing on non-interactivity, short proof size, and fast verification time. We focus on the fastest total proof time, in particular for large Boolean circuits. Under this metric, Garbled Circuit (GC)-based ZKP (Jawurek et al., [JKO], CCS 2013) remained the state-of-the-art technique due to the low-constant linear scaling of computing the garbling. We improve GC-ZKP for proof statements with conditional clauses. Our communication is proportional to the longest branch rather than to the entire proof statement. This is most useful when the number m of branches is large, resulting in up to factor $m\times$ improvement over JKO. In our proof-of-concept illustrative application, prover P demonstrates knowledge of a bug in a codebase consisting of any number of snippets of actual C code. Our computation cost is linear in the size of the codebase and communication is constant in the number of snippets. That is, we require only enough communication for a single largest snippet! Our conceptual contribution is stacked garbling for ZK, a privacy-free circuit garbling scheme that can be used with the JKO GC-ZKP protocol to construct more efficient ZKP. Given a Boolean circuit C and computational security parameter $\kappa$, our garbling is $L \cdot \kappa$ bits long, where $L$ is the length of the longest execution path in C. All prior concretely efficient garbling schemes produce garblings of size $|C| \cdot \kappa$. The computational cost of our scheme is not increased over prior state-of-the-art. We implement our GC-ZKP and demonstrate significantly improved ($m\times$ over JKO) ZK performance for functions with branching factor $m$. Compared with recent ZKP (STARK, Libra, KKW, Ligero, Aurora, Bulletproofs), our scheme offers much better proof times for larger circuits ($35-1000\times$ or more, depending on circuit size and compared scheme). For our illustrative application, we consider four C code snippets, each of about 30-50 LOC; one snippet allows an invalid memory dereference. The entire proof takes 0.15 seconds and communication is 1.5 MB.

  13. Fast Multiparty Threshold ECDSA with Fast Trustless Setup 2018 CCS EllipticCurves Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Rosario Gennaro and Steven Goldfeder

    A threshold signature scheme enables distributed signing among n players such that any subgroup of size t+1 can sign, whereas any group with t or fewer players cannot. While there exist previous threshold schemes for the ECDSA signature scheme, we present the first protocol that supports multiparty signatures for any t≤n with efficient, dealerless key generation. Our protocol is faster than previous solutions and significantly reduces the communication complexity as well. We prove our scheme secure against malicious adversaries with a dishonest majority. We implemented our protocol, demonstrating its efficiency and suitability to be deployed in practice.

  14. Generalizing the SPDZ Compiler For Other Protocols 2018 CCS MPC eprint.iacr.org
    Toshinori Araki, Assi Barak, Jun Furukawa, Marcel Keller, Yehuda Lindell, Kazuma Ohara, and Hikaru Tsuchida

    Protocols for secure multiparty computation (MPC) enable a set of mutually distrusting parties to compute an arbitrary function of their inputs while preserving basic security properties like \emph{privacy} and \emph{correctness}. The study of MPC was initiated in the 1980s where it was shown that any function can be securely computed, thus demonstrating the power of this notion. However, these proofs of feasibility were theoretical in nature and it is only recently that MPC protocols started to become efficient enough for use in practice. Today, we have protocols that can carry out large and complex computations in very reasonable time (and can even be very fast, depending on the computation and the setting). Despite this amazing progress, there is still a major obstacle to the adoption and use of MPC due to the huge expertise needed to design a specific MPC execution. In particular, the function to be computed needs to be represented as an appropriate Boolean or arithmetic circuit, and this requires very specific expertise. In order to overcome this, there has been considerable work on compilation of code to (typically) Boolean circuits. One work in this direction takes a different approach, and this is the SPDZ compiler (not to be confused with the SPDZ protocol) that takes high-level Python code and provides an MPC run-time environment for securely executing that code. The SPDZ compiler can deal with arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations and is extremely powerful. However, until now, the SPDZ compiler could only be used for the specific SPDZ family of protocols, making its general applicability and usefulness very limited.


    In this paper, we extend the SPDZ compiler so that it can work with general underlying protocols. Our SPDZ extensions were made in mind to enable the use of SPDZ for arbitrary protocols and to make it easy for others to integrate existing and new protocols. We integrated three different types of protocols, an honest-majority protocol for computing arithmetic circuits over a field (for any number of parties), a three-party honest majority protocol for computing arithmetic circuits over the ring of integers \Z2n, and the multiparty BMR protocol for computing Boolean circuits. We show that a single high-level SPDZ-Python program can be executed using all of these underlying protocols (as well as the original SPDZ protocol), thereby making SPDZ a true general run-time MPC environment.


    In order to be able to handle both arithmetic and non-arithmetic operations, the SPDZ compiler relies on conversions from field elements to bits and back. However, these conversions do not apply to ring elements (in particular, they require element division), and we therefore introduce new bit decomposition and recomposition protocols for the ring over integers with replicated secret sharing. These conversions are of independent interest and utilize the structure of \Z2n (which is much more amenable to bit decomposition than prime-order fields), and are thus much more efficient than all previous methods.


    We demonstrate our compiler extensions by running a complex SQL query and a decision tree evaluation over all protocols.

  15. Lattice-Based Group Signatures and Zero-Knowledge Proofs of Automorphism Stability 2018 CCS PQC Signatures ZK eprint.iacr.org
    Rafael del Pino, Vadim Lyubashevsky, and Gregor Seiler

    We present a group signature scheme, based on the hardness of lattice problems, whose outputs are more than an order of magnitude smaller than the currently most efficient schemes in the literature. Since lattice-based schemes are also usually non-trivial to efficiently implement, we additionally provide the first experimental implementation of lattice-based group signatures demonstrating that our construction is indeed practical – all operations take less than half a second on a standard laptop.


    A key component of our construction is a new zero-knowledge proof system for proving that a committed value belongs to a particular set of small size. The sets for which our proofs are applicable are exactly those that contain elements that remain stable under Galois automorphisms of the underlying cyclotomic number field of our lattice-based protocol. We believe that these proofs will find applications in other settings as well.


    The motivation of the new zero-knowledge proof in our construction is to allow the efficient use of the selectively-secure signature scheme (i.e. a signature scheme in which the adversary declares the forgery message before seeing the public key) of Agrawal et al. (Eurocrypt 2010) in constructions of lattice-based group signatures and other privacy protocols. For selectively-secure schemes to be meaningfully converted to standard signature schemes, it is crucial that the size of the message space is not too large. Using our zero-knowledge proofs, we can strategically pick small sets for which we can provide efficient zero-knowledge proofs of membership.

  16. Differentially Private Access Patterns in Secure Computation 2018 CCS DifferentialPrivacy MPC eprint.iacr.org
    Sahar Mazloom and S. Dov Gordon

    We explore a new security model for secure computation on large datasets. We assume that two servers have been employed to compute on private data that was collected from many users, and, in order to improve the efficiency of their computation, we establish a new tradeoff with privacy. Specifically, instead of claiming that the servers learn nothing about the input values, we claim that what they do learn from the computation preserves the differential privacy of the input. Leveraging this relaxation of the security model allows us to build a protocol that leaks some information in the form of access patterns to memory, while also providing a formal bound on what is learned from the leakage.


    We then demonstrate that this leakage is useful in a broad class of computations. We show that computations such as histograms, PageRank and matrix factorization, which can be performed in common graph-parallel frameworks such as MapReduce or Pregel, benefit from our relaxation. We implement a protocol for securely executing graph-parallel computations, and evaluate the performance on the three examples just mentioned above. We demonstrate marked improvement over prior implementations for these computations.

  17. NANOPI: Extreme-Scale Actively-Secure Multi-Party Computation 2018 CCS MPC homes.sice.indiana.edu
    Ruiyu Zhu, Darion Cassel, Amr Sabry, and Yan Huang

    Existing actively-secure MPC protocols require either linear rounds or linear space. Due to this fundamental space-round dilemma, no existing MPC protocols is able to run large-scale computations without significantly sacrificing performance. To mitigate this issue, we developed nanoPI, which is practically efficient in terms of both time and space. Our protocol is based on WRK but introduces interesting and necessary modifications to address several important programmatic and cryptographic challenges. A technique that may be of independent interest (in transforming other computation-oriented cryptographic protocols) is a staged execution model, which we formally define and realize using a combination of lightweight static and dynamic program instrumentation. Our techniques are integrated in nanoPI, an open-source tool for efficiently building and running actively-secure extreme-scale MPC applications. We demonstrate the unprecedented scalability and performance of nanoPI by building and running a suit of bench- mark applications, including an actively-secure four-party logistical regression (involving 4.7 billion ANDs and 8.9 billion XORs) which finished in less than 28 hours on four small-memory machines.

  18. Ouroboros Genesis: Composable Proof-of-Stake Blockchains with Dynamic Availability 2018 Blockchains CCS eprint.iacr.org
    Christian Badertscher, Peter Gazi, Aggelos Kiayias, Alexander Russell, and Vassilis Zikas

    Proof-of-stake-based (in short, PoS-based) blockchains aim to overcome scalability, effi- ciency, and composability limitations of the proof-of-work paradigm, which underlies the security of several mainstream cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin. Our work puts forth the first (global universally) composable (GUC) treatment of PoS-based blockchains in a setting that captures—for the first time in GUC—arbitrary numbers of parties that may not be fully operational, e.g., due to network problems, reboots, or updates of their OS that affect all or just some of their local resources including their network interface and clock. This setting, which we refer to as dynamic availability, naturally captures decentralized environments within which real-world deployed blockchain protocols are assumed to operate. We observe that none of the existing PoS-based blockchain protocols can realize the ledger functionality under dynamic availability in the same way that bitcoin does (using only the information available in the genesis block). To address this we propose a new PoS-based protocol, “Ouroboros Genesis”, that adapts one of the latest cryptographically-secure PoS-based blockchain protocols with a novel chain selection rule. The rule enables new or offline parties to safely (re-)join and bootstrap their blockchain from the genesis block without any trusted advice—such as checkpoints—or assumptions regarding past availability. We say that such a blockchain protocol can “bootstrap from genesis.” We prove the GUC security of Ouroboros Genesis against a fully adaptive adversary controlling less than half of the total stake. Our model allows adversarial scheduling of messages in a network with delays and captures the dynamic availability of participants in the worst case. Importantly, our protocol is effectively independent of both the maximum network delay and the minimum level of availability— both of which are run-time parameters. Proving the security of our construction against an adaptive adversary requires a novel martingale technique that may be of independent interest in the analysis of blockchain protocols.

  19. Lattice-Based zk-SNARKs from Square Span Programs 2018 CCS zkSNARK eprint.iacr.org
    Rosario Gennaro, Michele Minelli, Anca Nitulescu and Michele Orrù

    Zero-knowledge SNARKs (zk-SNARKs) are non-interactive proof systems with short (i.e., independent of the size of the witness) and efficiently verifiable proofs. They elegantly resolve the juxtaposition of individual privacy and public trust, by providing an efficient way of demonstrating knowledge of secret information without actually revealing it. To this day, zk-SNARKs are widely deployed all over the planet and are used to keep alive a system worth billion of euros, namely the cryptocurrency Zcash. However, all current SNARKs implementations rely on so-called pre-quantum assumptions and, for this reason, are not expected to withstand cryptanalitic efforts over the next few decades.


    In this work, we introduce a new zk-SNARK that can be instantiated from lattice-based assumptions, and which is thus believed to be post-quantum secure. We provide a generalization in the spirit of Gennaro et al. (Eurocrypt’13) to the SNARK of Danezis et al. (Asiacrypt’14) that is based on Square Span Programs (SSP) and relies on weaker computational assumptions. We focus on designated-verifier proofs and propose a protocol in which a proof consists of just 5 LWE encodings. We provide a concrete choice of parameters, showing that our construction is practically instantiable.

  20. Secure Outsourced Matrix Computation and Application to Neural Networks 2018 CCS FHE MachineLearning eprint.iacr.org
    Xiaoqian Jiang, Miran Kim, Kristin Lauter, and Yongsoo Song

    Homomorphic Encryption (HE) is a powerful cryptographic primitive to address privacy and security issues in outsourcing computation on sensitive data to an untrusted computation environment. Comparing to secure Multi-Party Computation (MPC), HE has advantages in supporting non-interactive operations and saving on communication costs. However, it has not come up with an optimal solution for modern learning frameworks, partially due to a lack of efficient matrix computation mechanisms.


    In this work, we present a practical solution to encrypt a matrix homomorphically and perform arithmetic operations on encrypted matrices. Our solution includes a novel matrix encoding method and an efficient evaluation strategy for basic matrix operations such as addition, multiplication, and transposition. We also explain how to encrypt more than one matrix in a single ciphertext, yielding better amortized performance.


    Our solution is generic in the sense that it can be applied to most of the existing HE schemes. It also achieves reasonable performance for practical use; for example, our implementation takes 0.6 seconds to multiply two encrypted square matrices of order 64 and 0.09 seconds to transpose a square matrix of order 64.


    Our secure matrix computation mechanism has a wide applicability to our new framework E2DM, which stands for encrypted data and encrypted model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that supports secure evaluation of the prediction phase based on both encrypted data and encrypted model, whereas previous work only supported applying a plain model to encrypted data. As a benchmark, we report an experimental result to classify handwritten images using convolutional neural networks (CNN). Our implementation on the MNIST dataset takes 1.69 seconds to compute ten likelihoods of 64 input images simultaneously, yielding an amortized rate of 26 milliseconds per image.

  21. Labeled PSI from Fully Homomorphic Encryption with Malicious Security 2018 CCS FHE PSI eprint.iacr.org
    Hao Chen, Zhicong Huang, Kim Laine and Peter Rindal

    Private Set Intersection (PSI) allows two parties, the sender and the receiver, to compute the intersection of their private sets without revealing extra information to each other. We are interested in the {\it unbalanced} PSI setting, where (1) the receiver’s set is significantly smaller than the sender’s, and (2) the receiver (with the smaller set) has a low-power device. Also, in a {\it Labeled PSI} setting, the sender holds a label per each item in its set, and the receiver obtains the labels from the items in the intersection. We build upon the unbalanced PSI protocol of Chen, Laine, and Rindal (CCS 2017) in several ways: we add efficient support for arbitrary length items, we construct and implement an unbalanced Labeled PSI protocol with small communication complexity, and also strengthen the security model using Oblivious Pseudo-Random Function (OPRF) in a pre-processing phase. Our protocols outperform previous ones: for an intersection of 220 and 512 size sets of arbitrary length items our protocol has a total online running time of just 1 second (single thread), and a total communication cost of 4 MB. For a larger example, an intersection of 228 and 1024 size sets of arbitrary length items has an online running time of 12 seconds (multi-threaded), with less than 18 MB of total communication.

  22. New Constructions for Forward and Backward Private Symmetric Searchable Encryption 2018 CCS SearchableEncryption SymmetricKey obj.umiacs.umd.edu
    Javad Ghareh Chamani, Dimitrios Papadopoulos, Charalampos Papamanthou, and Rasool Jalili

    We study the problem of dynamic symmetric searchable encryption. In that setting, it is crucial to minimize the information revealed to the server as a result of update operations (insertions and deletions). Two relevant privacy properties have been defined in that context: forward and backward privacy. The first makes it hard for the server to link an update operation with previous queries and has been extensively studied in the literature. The second limits what the server can learn about entries that were deleted from the database, from queries that happen after the deletion. Backward privacy was formally studied only recently (Bost et al., CCS 2017) in a work that introduced a formal definition with three variable types of leakage (Type-I to Type-III ordered from most to least secure), as well as the only existing schemes that satisfy this property. In this work, we introduce three novel constructions that improve previous results in multiple ways. The first scheme achieves Type-II backward privacy and our experimental evaluation shows it has 145-253X faster search computation times than previous constructions with the same leakage. Surprisingly, it is faster even than schemes with Type-III leakage which makes it the most efficient implementation of a forward and backward private scheme so far. The second one has search time that is asymptotically within a polylogarithmic multiplicative factor of the theoretical optimal (i.e., the result size of a search), and it achieves the strongest level of backward privacy (Type-I). All previous Type-I constructions require time that is at least linear in the total number of updates for the requested keywords, even the (arbitrarily many) previously deleted ones. Our final scheme improves upon the second one by reducing the number of roundtrips for a search at the cost of extra leakage (Type-III).

  23. ALCHEMY: A Language and Compiler for Homomorphic Encryption Made easY 2018 CCS FHE web.eecs.umich.edu
    Eric Crockett, Chris Jason Peikert, and Chad Sharp

    Fully Homomorphic Encryption (FHE) is a cryptographic “holy grail” that allows a worker to perform arbitrary computations on client-encrypted data, without learning anything about the data itself. Since the first plausible construction in 2009, a variety of FHE implementations have been given and used for particular applications of interest. Unfortunately, using FHE is currently very complicated, and a great deal of expertise is required to properly implement nontrivial homomorphic computations. This work introduces ALCHEMY, a modular and extensible system that simplifies and accelerates the use of FHE. ALCHEMY compiles “in-the-clear” computations on plaintexts, written in a modular domain-specific language~(DSL), into corresponding homomorphic computations on ciphertexts—with no special knowledge of FHE required of the programmer. The compiler automatically chooses (most of the) parameters by statically inferring ciphertext noise rates, generates keys and “key-switching hints,” schedules appropriate ciphertext “maintenance” operations, and more. In addition, its components can be combined modularly to provide other useful functionality, such logging the empirical noise rates of ciphertexts throughout a computation, without requiring any changes to the original DSL code. As a testbed application, we demonstrate fast homomorphic evaluation of a pseudorandom function~(PRF) based on Ring-LWR, whose entire implementation is only a few dozen lines of simple DSL code. For a single (non-batched) evaluation, our unoptimized implementation takes only about 10 seconds on a commodity PC, which is more than an order of magnitude faster than state-of-the-art homomorphic evaluations of other PRFs, including some specifically designed for amenability to homomorphic evaluation.

  24. Private Stateful Information Retrieval 2018 CCS PIR eprint.iacr.org
    Sarvar Patel, Giuseppe Persiano, and Kevin Yeo

    Private information retrieval (PIR) is a fundamental tool for preserving query privacy when accessing outsourced data. All previous PIR constructions have significant costs preventing widespread use. In this work, we present private stateful information retrieval (PSIR), an extension of PIR, allowing clients to be stateful and maintain information between multiple queries. Our design of the PSIR primitive maintains three important properties of PIR: multiple clients may simultaneously query without complex concurrency primitives, query privacy should be maintained if the server colludes with other clients, and new clients should be able to enroll into the system by exclusively interacting with the server.


    We present a PSIR framework that reduces an online query to performing one single-server PIR on a sub-linear number of database records. All other operations beyond the single-server PIR consist of cryptographic hashes or plaintext operations. In practice, the dominating costs of resources occur due to the public-key operations involved with PIR. By reducing the input database to PIR, we are able to limit expensive computation and avoid transmitting large ciphertexts. We show that various instantiations of PSIR reduce server CPU by up to 10x and online network costs by up to 10x over the previous best PIR construction.

  25. TACHYON: Fast Signatures from Compact Knapsack 2018 CCS PQC Signatures eprint.iacr.org
    Rouzbeh Behnia, Muslum Ozgur Ozmen, Attila A. Yavuz, and Mike Rosulek

    We introduce a simple, yet efficient digital signature scheme which offers post-quantum security promise. Our scheme, named TACHYON, is based on a novel approach for extending one-time hash-based signatures to (polynomially bounded) many-time signatures, using the additively homomorphic properties of generalized compact knapsack functions. Our design permits TACHYON to achieve several key properties. First, its signing and verification algorithms are the fastest among its current counterparts with a higher level of security. This allows TACHYON to achieve the lowest end-to-end delay among its counterparts, while also making it suitable for resource-limited signers. Second, its private keys can be as small as κ bits, where κ is the desired security level. Third, unlike most of its lattice-based counterparts, TACHYON does not require any Gaussian sampling during signing, and therefore, is free from side-channel attacks targeting this process. We also explore various speed and storage trade-offs for TACHYON, thanks to its highly tunable parameters. Some of these trade-offs can speed up TACHYON signing in exchange for larger keys, thereby permitting TACHYON to further improve its end-to-end delay.